Greenhouse Bulbs 2011

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Tony wrote:

Some terrestrial European orchids. Not always thought of as bulbous these go dormant in summer and have a small tuber. Many have been renamed but I do not subscribe to the manic need to split everything up and so ther may be some disagreement about my naming

Two Ophrys lutea
      Ophrys papiloniacea
      Orchis morio
      Orchis anatolica

Awesome orchids Tony.  I have long admired Ophrys orchids with their amazing colors, patterns, and insect-imitating forms.  Googling them I read that "most Ophrys orchids are dependent on symbiotic fungi"; please tell us how you grows yours, do you use any sort of host plant?  Again googling around, I find this fascinating: "Ophrys use sexual deception to attract pollinators to their flowers" and "in sexual deception, an orchid attracts male pollinators by producing the sex pheromone of virgin female pollinators in addition to providing visual and tactile cues".

Orchis anatolica is a real beauty, love the spotted foliage.  I wonder if it would be growable outdoors in a dryish habitat.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Mark

I think the need for symbiotic fungi is only at the germination stage and that once the plant has moved into green growth it is not critical. I have always taken the view that any fungi in the soil must be on the tuber as well and therefore is always present. The Orchis anatolica is a typical example of how I grow them. In individual pots with a compost of 50% John Innes and grit. They go dormant about end of May and I keep them dry until end September. Just moist and frost free all winter but with as much light and air as possible. No I do not think they will grow outside unless you have a Mediterranean climate.

As to sexual deception how does this one grab you?

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I'm easily deceived ;D

Wasn't sure of the root of the name O. fuciflora, presumably from the latin "fucus" which refers to seaweed, or a rock lichen used as a red dye, any kind of face paint or dye, a false show [Obs]; the latter making sense as it pertains to the insect mimicry of Ophrys flowers.  If one could paint a dot on each of the two lateral pink floral parts (don't know the true name of what to call them), that flower would look just like Krusty the Clown laughing :o

Orchis anatolica appears to be a popular one, tons of information on web pages on this one, here's a link to the Van Flora site:
http://www.vanherbaryum.yyu.edu.tr/flora/famgenustur/orchis.htm
http://www.vanherbaryum.yyu.edu.tr/flora/famgenustur/or/or/an/index.htm

It describes the species as from sea level to 1650 m. in Macchie, scrub, Pinus forest. I wonder if any of the higher elevation forms would be hardy.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Mark

I have looked at the Van Flora on many occasions for various plants. The pictures on the page for Orchis anatolica are in my opinion not that species but possibly O. morio.

I have seen O. anatolica  quite high  but never at the elevation suggested and it is possible at the maximum elevation they will have been snow covered in winter but then they get a scorching summer. I have seen many orchids in the Med and apart from the  hardy ones such as dactylorhiza they have been low growing and not subject to hard frosts. The problem is they make their leaf growth in the autumn and cold wet rots them off.

Paul T
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Tony,

Absolutely glorious orchid pics.  So beautiful!!  Thanks so much!

Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9°C. Max summer temp 40°C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tony, I am impressed!

Orchis morio is a native of Norway too and take a great deal of cold weather in winter!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

a couple more orchids in flower

Another Orchid morio ,this is a very small plant only 3 inches tall
and
Ophrys tenthredinifera

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Beautiful stuff, Matt and Tony! A cool, even cold greenhouse is high on my wishlist! Excellent way to speed spring, or even improve winter if you have winter bloomers...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

here is another one which I am calling Ophrys spegodes but it could be any one of many!!

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Gorgeous Ophrys...never would have thought to grow those in a greenhouse.

I am cross posting here as my blooming Leucocoryne ixioides in the greenhouse at work is currently blooming (posted on image of the day and the leucocoryne thread started earlier)

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

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