Allium 2011

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Barstow
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Joined: 2010-08-27

Nice onion, Rick! Notice that Ozoke from Kew which I posted above also has dark pedicels!

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Stephenb wrote:

Nice onion, Rick! Notice that Ozoke from Kew which I posted above also has dark pedicels!

Hmmm, I'll have to go look at my various thunbergii forms for pedicel color. Stephen, at first I didn't notice the reddish color to the A. thunbergii 'Ozawa' picture you posted.  By the way, just to keep the naming straight, the spelling 'Ozoke' is a name corruption for 'Ozawa' that's often encountered in cultivation... even at Kew ;)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Boland
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Joined: 2009-09-25

I got this as a dwarf form of thunbergii but could it be virgunculae?

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Todd wrote:

I got this as a dwarf form of thunbergii but could it be virgunculae?

Very nice Todd, rather profuse flowering isn't it.  Well, the taxonomy on these little Japanese autumn blooming onions is something to wade through, check the links above for information on recently described species in the thunbergii-virgunculae alliance, and three varieties of Allium virgunculae, or use this link: http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=576.msg11906#msg11906
These link back to lengthy discussions on the SRGC forum.

I believe lots of the smaller "thunbergii" forms going around out there might in fact be one of the varieties of A. virgunculae... here's a photo link to A. virgunculae var. kiiense.
http://hanamist.sakura.ne.jp/flower/tansiyo/yuri/kiito.html

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

deesen
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Joined: 2011-01-31

Just obtained seed of Allium platycaule the originals of which were a Jim Archibald collection under JCA 12988. Should I treat them as a winter or summer grower please?

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

deesen wrote:

Just obtained seed of Allium platycaule the originals of which were a Jim Archibald collection under JCA 12988. Should I treat them as a winter or summer grower please?

Seed of most Western American Allium species requires cold stratification, I recommend sowing now, you should get germination in spring.  Allium platycaule is a spring growing/flowering onion, it goes dormant immediately after flowering and stay dormant for the rest of the year. Accordingly, can't get much growth out of these in a year, so it typically takes minimum 3-5 years for flowering.  Good luck, it's a worthwhile species to wait for.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

deesen
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Joined: 2011-01-31

Many thanks for that Mark.

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

deesen
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A friend on mine in Germany has obtained seeds of Nothoscordum montividense ssp minorum and is seeking advice as to the best time to sow them. Can anyone help please?

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

David, one of my favorite little bulbs, I only have one small windowsill where I overwinter some of these cute little yellow Nothoscordums. 

Nothoscordum montevidense and ssp. minarum are easy from seed.  Since it flowers twice a year, late fall to winter and again in spring, one can get seed in spring, and if indoor autumn blooms are hand pollinated, one can get late season seed too.  Mine are throwing up some blooms now, but I haven't bothered to pollinate them much less look at them, because I don't see them during the week (it's dark when I leave in the morning and dark when I get home). Seed sown, watered, and kept frost free (warm) germinates easily. 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

deesen
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Joined: 2011-01-31

Many thanks for that Mark, I'll pass it on.

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

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