NARGS Membership - Why or Why Not?

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cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Mark, could you please clarify the seed exchange pricing structure for me, I only looked at it once, and may have got it wrong-- besides the membership fees (obviously) there is a per packet price, no? When I was looking at it, I was considering joining with the seed exchange as the only benefit, and so would add the membership fees to the cost of the seeds.. I've never seen a bulletin, so that was not factored into my calculations..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Cohan,
The seed exchange costs a lump sum of $15 US for ordering seeds.  That's for 25 packets for nondonors, and 35 packets for donors (that is, those who donate 5 different taxa or more).  
The seed list is the most interesting (therefore best, IMO) seedex list that I am aware of - for example, the 2010-2011 list contains 3014 varieties of garden-collected seed, and 613 varieties of wild-collected seed.

After the main seedex takes place, with donors getting precedence for orders, there is another round for the dispersal of "surplus seed" which is at an even more attractive price - 20 packets for $5US, 40 packets for $10US, 60 for $15, 80 for $20 and 100 for $25!  (Errr, I guess I could have just simplified it by saying $0.25 per packet, but those are the order quantities that are set out.  ;))

For us as non-US donors, there is a reasonably simple process for sending seeds across the border (one just has to follow the directions, and I have managed to get it completely right in the last couple of years, it seems... I'm sure Laura S. must be relieved!  :D) .  Everything one needs to know about the seedex can be found out by following the various links here:

http://www.nargs.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=232:ba...

I originally joined NARGS for the seedex alone, but then started to find the book sales very worthwhile.  Eventually I  realized the value of the Garden Quarterly.... I have started re-reading my collection this winter on the train to/from work!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Skulski wrote:

I originally joined NARGS for the seedex alone, but then started to find the book sales very worthwhile.  Eventually I  realized the value of the Garden Quarterly.... I have started re-reading my collection this winter on the train to/from work!

Thanks Lori for answering Cohan's question in detail.This year I actually did not request any NARGS seed from the seed exchange, mostly because of last year's hybridization efforts where I have sown over 50 flats of Epimedium, Jeffersonia, and Iris and think I might be overwhelmed by seedlings as it is.  But then I just got a notice about the NARGS surplus seed list, and after all the of talk about certain plants on the forum, I have acquiesced to my plant lust, now aching to try some more seed, so I will indeed send in a modest order.  At $5 for 20 packets (for NARGS members), it's a total bargain, and there is still lots of wild-collected seed available.  I think even this still-unemployed guy can afford $10 for 40 packets!

Lori, I started doing exactly what you're doing, rereading the old NARGS/ARGS Quarterly publications.  I have them in cluttered stacks all over the place, and finally did some spring cleaning, gathered them all up, and put them on a bookshelf in order, starting from the mid 1960s to current.  There's an amazing amount of good stuff locked up in these bulletins; I had forgotten about so much of it.  Needless to say, what started out as a simple organization of my NARGS Quarterly collection dragged into days, as I started rereading them. :o

By the way, there's another good NARGS Rock Garden Quarterly coming up soon (Spring 2011) featuring Alliums, part 1 of a two-part article I've written. ;)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Mark, regarding the publication, I wonder if you had an accidental temporary lapse in subscription.  It's happened to me with Minnesota public radio.  I've been a member since 1977, minus 6 month (when I had forgotten to renew), so my card says "member since 1982".  ;D

A couple years ago, an older member in our Chapter gave me here collection of ARGS Bulletins (now called the Rock Garden Quarterly) back to the 1960's.  I voraciously read a lot of them last winter, but haven't had much time this "off" season.  There is so much usable information that you can't find anywhere else!

And I'll say it again: I love the new look!

                   

--------- I am very much looking forward to your articles, Mark!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Thanks for the extra details, Lori, I had looked at it all before, but only once, so I wasn't that clear on it..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

I mentioned under introductions that I joined the NARGS especially for the seed exchange (and notably because overseas donors get first bite at the biscuit!). Also the NARGS, and SRGC, are much more Garden orientated and dare I say democratic than the AGS in Britain, despite the latter's wonderful traditions. I enjoy the diversity of articles in the Quarterly which at times can become quite poetic, I think a fine literary tradition which takes you into the landscapes and the plants we find so fascinating. American gardeners are also, I feel, still pioneers in such a vast and varied land, something we can't have in the same way in the UK. This leads to a greater open-mindedness and sharing of ideas, all in all very worthy attributes. Perhaps we need to develop a Chapter in the UK!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

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