Schynige Platte

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HughGmail
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-07-08

Booker wrote:

Many thanks, Mark ... all the scars on my extensive belly were worth it then?  :D
I have a passion for globularias and the Alps and the Dolomites satisfy my passion very well.

Looking at your lovely image of the Globularia catapulted me into a quasi 1960's hallucination; I felt as though my being had been integrated with the very substance of the plant - outstanding images.

Hugh Mac Millan
Former NARGS Web Master, Moderator
Eriogonum enthusiast
Zone 5+- - Front Range, Colorado (Denver area)

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

More delirium than hallucination if it has anything to do with me, Hugh!  ;D

Many thanks for your very kind comments.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Booker wrote:

Hi Anne,
From my image files and from memory ... (and in no particular order), the meadows, crags and ridges of Schynige Platte were some of our best ever sites for many of the spring plants we normally see in the Dolomites; Gentiana verna; Gentiana acaulis; Pulsatilla vernalis; Pulsatilla alpina and P. alpina apiifolia; Primula auricula; Crocus vernus ssp. albiflorus (by the millions); Soldanella alpina; Linaria alpina; Ranunculus alpestris; Ajuga pyramidalis; Saxifraga oppositifolia; Primulas (numerous); Silene acaulis; Thymus; early orchids, etc, etc.
I would recommend Wengen, Murren, Grindlewald, Schynige Platte and surrounds for anyone seeking the very best of European high alpine flora. We arrived at the beginning of June and the snow had recently melted ... we have never seen so many magnificent examples of common, pristine and exquisite alpines.
A few images that were easily accessible ... more later if you aren't sated.

  Please, sir, could I have some more??

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Hi Anne,
Unfortunately I haven't the time at the moment to go through the SRGC pages to see which images I have already posted there, so I will simply post a batch here and hope that I haven't included too many duplicates.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Several more ...

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Marvelous photos, Cliff.  A really beautiful shot of Polygala chamaebuxus - it's usually hiding under thiings in the Dolomites and hard to get a clear shot of it.  This one looks like it was posing for you.

Paul T
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

I've only just caught up with this topic, so sorry for the delay.

Great pics, Cliff.  I particularly loved the Anemone narcissiflora, now wishing that the plant I was given a few years ago had actually grown.  :rolleyes:  So many beauties in your pics.  I deliberately have not gone into the link you posted on the first page, as Mark warned he took 90 minutes there and I don't have the time.  ;D

Thanks!

Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9°C. Max summer temp 40°C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

OMG Cliff.....absolutely spectacular!  I need to get there!  My brief exposure to the Pyrenees has shown me that I definitely need to visit the Alps, Dolomites and other European alpine regions.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

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