Yucca whipplei

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Tim, your garden is sheer spectacle! Inspiring to see such fantastic plantings.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Thanks Mark, it's very nice of you to say so! I think few gardeners have such a passion for plants which is why it is so great to meet up with gardeners in the States. Our aim has always been to grow a very wide range of species, rarely seen in gardens (usually from wild collected seed), and then propagate these and make them available to visitors. I hope the day of the specialist nursery will return because it makes for far more interesting and diverse gardens.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram Faversham, Kent, UK I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.  

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

A final update on Yucca whipplei - summer storms and rain have rather lashed the plant but these are a few pictures showing the development of the flowering panicle again and close ups of a flower raceme and of an individual flower. What a plant to grow in your garden!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram Faversham, Kent, UK I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.  

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Weather can sure prevent those prize photos that you would cherish forever, can't it...But the ones you show here are superb!

Very curious how fat the filaments, especially below the anthers.  Any story about that?  Is this normal for the whole genus?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Rick The fat filaments come standard in this genus. What I find kind of unique is the lacy crown of filaments around the edge of the stigma tip.

Here are close ups of some of the yuccas I grow.

Yucca angustissima ssp. kanabensis

Yucca elata

Yucca harrimaniae var. gilbertiana  

Yucca glauca ssp. glauca

From the High Desert Steppe of the Great Basin and the Eastern Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7 http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/ John P Weiser

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

John - very nice to see those comparisons. Do you know how common it is amongst yuccas to have strongly coloured flowers? There was that amazing example earlier on of Y. whipplei, and I know of Y. glauca from Claude Barr's book. I was also quite struck by the strong scent (of lemons) of the flowers - maybe more pronounced in the evening? I have a plant of Y. thompsoniana just producing a flower spike and will look at this more closely than I have before.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram Faversham, Kent, UK I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.  

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

The Yuccas are beautiful! Both the plant and the flowers ;D

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

I do not think it is very common to have strongly colored flowers on mature blossoms. My Yucca angustissima ssp. kanabensis and one of my Yucca glauca ssp. glauca have rose/purple flushes to the outside surface of the flowers when they first start to develop. But it quickly fades to cream as they gain size. The Y. elata does have deep brown stems on the inflorescence a nice contrast to the creamy white flowers.

I have never detected any fragrance to the blossoms of my Yuccas. That is interesting!

Below you may be able to discern the brown stems of the Yucca eleta that is if you can see between the flowers. The second photo is a closeup of the flowers and stem before they were fully open.  

From the High Desert Steppe of the Great Basin and the Eastern Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7 http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/ John P Weiser

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Love the yucca flower line up.  Nice pic everyone. :)

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

If I didn't already know that I wish I could grow Yuccas, I would know now for sure ;D

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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