Wenatchee Mountains

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deesen
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Thanks David, i'll be looking out for both.

David Nicholson in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

deesen
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Just managed to get hold of a small plant of Claytonia megarhiza v. nivalis so David, if you're reading this any tips on compost, method etc. for growing under glass would be much appreciated. Managed to get hold of a small plant of Douglasia montana too :) :)

David Nicholson in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Booker
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Hi David,Claytonia megarhiza v. nivalis grows and flowers well in a medium sized pot here in Lancashire.  It stays outside (i.e. no cover whatsoever) from the end of April until October and then in an open-sided frame throughout the winter.  It is in a very gritty compost with pebbles incorporated into the mix. It has self-seeded into adjoining pots, but these seedlings don't transplant very easily.  I might be tempted to sow some of your seed onto a large pot capable of supporting these deep rooted plants for their lifetime.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus On the moors in Lancashire, U.K. Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

deesen
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Hi Cliff,

Many thanks for that. Does it mind lime please?

David Nicholson in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Sellars
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Joined: 2009-12-29

David:My potting mix for pots in the Alpine Shed is mostly coarse sand with about 15 -25% crusher fines and a little bit of pH corrected peat. We can't get John Innes composts here so we have to make it up as we go along. The crusher fines have lots of mineral nutrients which I think is a real bonus. Because I have no soil at all in the mix I occasionally add a bit of fertilizer.

My experiment with a sunny sand bed with lumps of tufa and sub-irrigation is working well.  The Douglasia nivalis survived the soggy, wet winter and produced quite a few flowers (see below). I planted Claytonia megarhiza v nivalis last spring in a similar location and it is doing fine but has not yet been though a winter. Both plants grow in serpentine areas in the Wenatchee Mountains so are pretty tough. There is no limestone anywhere near where they grow but they don't seem to mind growing among lumps of tufa. There may not be much or any lime released by the tufa though.

David Sellars From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada Feature your favourite hikes at: www.mountainflora.ca MountainFlora videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/MountainFlora

Booker
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That is a very interesting growing regime David and it appears to be working well.  I suspect that the Claytonia will tolerate (but certainly not require) a modicum of lime.  I don't purposely introduce lime, but there may be a little released by the mixed pebbles that I include. Be wary of pampering them too much Mr. N. ... like a great many alpines they repay neglect and disdain, well they do in my garden anyway!  :D

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus On the moors in Lancashire, U.K. Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Lori S.
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Joined: 2009-10-27

Great info, David.  Is Douglasia nivalis more difficult to grow than D. montana?

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Sellars
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Lori:

I have certainly found Douglasia nivalis easier to grow than Douglasia montana. Mind you the Douglasia montana I have had were purchased plants and it may do better from a seed grown plant (or at least you have more plants so you can accept a few losses  :D )  Most Androsaces seem to come easily from seed and Douglasia nivalis is no exception.  I have attempted to grow Douglasia montana with seed from the Androsace Group of the AGS. They grew very well but turned out to be a hybrid of Androsace carnea  :-\ .

Wild seed of Douglasia nivalis is currently available through the Alpine Garden Club of British Columbia Seed Exchange.

http://www.agc-bc.ca/seed-list

David Sellars From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada Feature your favourite hikes at: www.mountainflora.ca MountainFlora videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/MountainFlora

Lori S.
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Joined: 2009-10-27

Douglasia montana seems to grow pretty easily here (not to claim I grow it particularly well however)... it does seem to bode well for growing D. nivalis, though.  I will look out for it.

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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Just found this thread- great place and plants, David!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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