Wenatchee Mountains

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Booker
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Joined: 2010-01-30

Superb images David ... many thanks for posting.  Another mountain range we MUST visit!

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus On the moors in Lancashire, U.K. Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26
David wrote:

Lori:

The entire hike up Iron Peak is on serpentine rock and soil which gives a strange appearance to the vegetation. There are areas with no trees at quite a low elevation and Douglasia nivalis grows in those open areas as well as on the ridge.  The summit ridge of Iron Peak is all rusty brown rock and scree dotted with an amazing collection of plants unlike anywhere I have ever seen.

David, that might be a clue why Douglasia nivalis doesn't stay with me for more than a couple of years.  It must need something in the soil it's not getting.  It's such a lovely plant and blooms so early.

Sellars
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Joined: 2009-12-29

Anne:

Douglasia nivalis also grows on Tronsen Ridge (sandstone) and Chumstick Mountain which doesn't appear to be serpentine.  I suspect that it grows on Iron Peak because it can tolerate the serpentine and the serpentine eliminates most of the competition.

I too have tried Douglsis nivalis in the garden but lost it quite quickly. It grows OK in a clay pot in a plunge bed in the Alpine Shed.  I am currently trying it in a sand bed among tufa blocks. That may sound strange as it is obviously not a calcicole but it seems lots of plants like tufa so it is an experiment.

David Sellars From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada Feature your favourite hikes at: www.mountainflora.ca MountainFlora videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/MountainFlora

Sellars
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Talking of Chumstick Mountain we also drove up to the top of this wonderful natural rock garden located northeast of Leavenworth. The huge beds of Douglasia nivalis had finished flowering and it was a bit too early for seed but there were lots of other plants still in flower.  Two outstanding plants were Calochortus lyallii and Lilium columbianum.

David Sellars From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada Feature your favourite hikes at: www.mountainflora.ca MountainFlora videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/MountainFlora

Anne Spiegel
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Joined: 2010-01-26

I think some of the plants that grow so well with tufa may simply like the better supply of moisture and can be tolerant of lime.  It's amazing the wide range of plants that seem to grow well near or in tufa.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Wonderful topic; I've wanted to respond but have been way too busy. David, wonderful photos of great plants!

When I lived in the Seattle Washington area from 1982-86, my favorite botanizing haunts included the Wenatchee Mts... the memory stream back when I see these images in this thread.  I have often wondered why only the typical apricot-pinkish form of Lewisia tweedyi was in cultivation, when there are some incredible yellow forms and yellow-strongly-tinged-red forms.  For some reason two plants always come to mind when I think of the Wenatchees; Penstemon gairdneri, like small bonsai shrubs in two color forms; an intense purplish form, but it was the clear deep blues that I liked best, and Eriogonum douglasii (in a narrow rolled-leaf form that corresponds to the entity "var. tenue") that came in every color from cream to incredible candy pinks to raspberry reds among dwarf mats of ash-silver foliage.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Barstow
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Joined: 2010-08-27

Wonderful pictures again! I particularly liked the Lomatium!!

Stephen Barstow Malvik, Norway 63.4N Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Howey
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Joined: 2010-05-17

David, I loved your report and photos from the Wenatchee Mountains - have tried to grow Douglasias and Claytonias here without luck (if you can't grow them out there near their native habitat, I probably don't have a hope of success out here with them).  I did have some success with a Calochortus bulb one time - planted it VERY deep on a south facing slope and it did well for a couple of years and then just disppeared.  Would very much like to have more of them but have steered clear of ordering seeds from the Seedex as they take such a long time to reach flowering stage (as do all lilies in my experience) and, at my age, there just isn't enough time for the 'slow pokes'.  Fran

Frances HoweyLondon, Ontario, CanadaZone 5b

deesen
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Joined: 2011-01-31

Following this with great interest. Would I be wasting my time trying some Douglasia and Claytonia outside here in my wet(very) Zone 9b and would they take to pot cultivation under glass?

David Nicholson in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Sellars
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deesen wrote:

Following this with great interest. Would I be wasting my time trying some Douglasia and Claytonia outside here in my wet(very) Zone 9b and would they take to pot cultivation under glass?

David/Fran:

I have had Douglasia laevigata growing outside for about 8 years.  The flowering is not spectacular though - nothing like in the wild. I tried Claytonia megarhiza outside and Douglasia nivalis but they soon packed it in.  I am now trying Douglasia nivalis in a sunnier spot in the garden among bits of tufa.  So far it looks good but they have to survive a wet winter yet.

Pot cultivation under glass is definitely easier. I have had Claytonia megarhiza v nivalis  for several years in the plunge bed in my Alpine Shed and have had good flowers.  Douglasia nivalis is also quite easy in a pot.  This one was from seed from Chumstick Mountain a couple of years ago and it flowered beautifully last Spring.

David Sellars From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada Feature your favourite hikes at: www.mountainflora.ca MountainFlora videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/MountainFlora

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