Viola species - confusing latin names

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cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

These all look nice- Violas and variegates- what's not to like?

Did everyone get their plants figured out during the season?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

cohan wrote:

These all look nice- Violas and variegates- what's not to like?

Did everyone get their plants figured out during the season?

 

Sometimes ignorance is bliss , the more I look the more I wonder. On the internet (particularly on Japanese sites) there's a surprising number of look-alike species with variegated forms.  The mystery of my two violets can wait for another year.

 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tingley
Title: Member
Joined: 2013-01-07

After reading through this discussion, I figure that my plants are actually Viola variegata. The plants appear to be cleistogamous as Lori noted earlier in the discussion. I notice seed pods, but never a single  bloom. Would high ambient temperatures play a role in this? The seedlings have been growing all summer in our greenhouse, so they have experienced higher than normal temperature and light levels for the full season. Now that the plants are large enough, they are being moved into permanent locations in the landscape. Next year will tell me if the cleistogamy is permanent, or due to cultural conditions.

Thanks for the education about these gems!

Southwest Nova Scotia, zone 6b or thereabouts

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

I think no flowers for a violet would be very disappointing! Though these do have lovely foliage to make up for it... I have a Saussurea received as nepalensis which has made tons of flowers that never opened, but produced seed (is cleistogamous still the right term for Asteraceae) and the foliage is not that exciting...lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Mark McD wrote:

Sometimes ignorance is bliss , the more I look the more I wonder. On the internet (particularly on Japanese sites) there's a surprising number of look-alike species with variegated forms.  The mystery of my two violets can wait for another year.

 

I can relate- I grow a lot of cacti and succulents indoors, and there are some popular genera that are huge with highly variable species, plus issues of hybridisation in culture- in many cases I've decided that if they don't come with provenance and reliable names, they will remain forever nameless..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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