Springtime in the Rocky Mountains

41 posts / 0 new
Last post
RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Nice to see that everything has popped up again, including the trees (I assume). :)  The resilience is remarkable.

Oh Jane, what a delight it must be to be able to stroll out on your deck in the morning, in your pj's and coffee in hand, and satisfy yourself with the creations you made below! (and not to mention the mountain views!)  :o

Is that your native rock in your island gardens?  As I have demonstrated more than once on this forum, my knowledge of mountain geology is lacking, but I would have expected the rocks to be less rounded...

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Glad to see that snow didn't linger, Jane. The latest we've had snow here in Aberdeen, North East Scotland, in the time I've lived ,is 12th June.... too flippin' late! By that time all our tulips etc are over, of course... it would be the paeonias, meconopsis and lilies that got whacked.  :P Each year when folks are talking of putting out summer plants I'm thinking that I'd wait till  the middle of June to be safe! Just as well I've given up on annual plantings!

Maggi

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret) Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

When I lived in Oslo I experienced June snowfall once or twice but here at the west coast, never. That don't mean we can't have a night or two with below freezing temperatures when the sky is clear and the air is from north.

This year our latest night frost was March 31.We have a proverb: "Mai kulde gjør bondens lader fulde" (Frost in May makes the farmer's stores full (or something like that)) meaning that a little freezing in May makes the plants bushier  with more flowers and hence cropping more. I think especially cereals benefit from a little frost ;)

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Loved your "day later" picture, Jane.  What are the drifts of blue?

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Super series of images Jane ... and a beautiful garden.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus On the moors in Lancashire, U.K. Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Lots of great colour there--once the snow is gone!Amazingly we didn't have snow in May this year (or very early, if we did) often we get several, and a good dump late in May.. June snow has happened historically, though I don't remember any notable ones, personally.. this year there was snow in early June many places in Alberta, and we had a dusting that was gone by the time I got up...lolWe are, however having rain every day...... :rolleyes:

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hendrix
Hendrix's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-12-24

Rick,

I suppose it would be nice to stroll out on our deck in the morning in my PJ's with a cup of coffee but with a typical summer morning temperature in the high 30's to low 40's F., I prefer to look at my gardens and the snow-covered mountains from the inside of our house (with the heater running!).  I don't own even one pair of shorts or short-sleeved blouse or shirt or sandals.  In fact, I wear Ragg Wool heavy gray hiking socks and study leather boots every day when working in my garden, which give me excellent traction and support when I am balancing on the rocks of the walls and stepping stones besides keeping my feet warm.

Regarding the rocks of my constructed raised beds, yes, they are native to my area.  They are gneiss and have decorative, wavy bands of light and dark gray.  I believe they are glacial till and that's why they are so smooth and rounded.  I brought them up in our Ford Explorer (40 per trip-maximum) from a rock field at the bottom of our valley where they were deposited on the surface over 100 years ago as a result of hydraulic and dredging operations for the extraction of placer gold.  I decided to use this banded gneiss just in case my initial attempts at growing perennials at this altitude (10,000 feet) resulted in failure.  At least the rocks would make an attractive display!

Jane

Jane Hendrix
Mountain View Experimental Gardens
Peak 7-Breckenridge, Colorado USA.
Elev: 10,000 feet
Zone 4
http://www.picturetrail.com/hendrix & http://www.picturetrail.com/snowtrekker7

 

Hendrix
Hendrix's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-12-24

Maggi,

I do hope we are through with snow for this past season.  Our total at our house this year is 275 inches (about 700cm).  The Breckenridge ski area, which is about 1,000 feet higher than our house, recorded 525 inches (1,333 cm).

Shaking the snow off the tulips and daffodils and the aspen trees very early in the morning (about 5:30 a.m.) saved the plants from stem and branch breakage.  It was still snowing at that hour and so I had to repeat that action about 6 hours later. 

Today it was sunny and pleasantly warm.  The red Darwin tulips were luminescent. surrounded by a sea of blue Muscari armeniacum.  Lewisias and Oxalis (adenophylla and enneaphylla) were the "blooms of the day".  Allium brevistylum from southern Wyoming are ready to pop open, while volunteers of Mertensia lanceolata are sporting nodding sprays of sky-blue flowers and the blood-red blossoms of our native Sedum integrifolium are catching the eye of passers-by.

In the wild behind our house, Caltha leptosepala and its "friend" Trollius laxus are waking up our wetlands while our most beloved woodland species, Calypso bulbosa, is in full flourish.

Jane

Jane Hendrix
Mountain View Experimental Gardens
Peak 7-Breckenridge, Colorado USA.
Elev: 10,000 feet
Zone 4
http://www.picturetrail.com/hendrix & http://www.picturetrail.com/snowtrekker7

 

Hendrix
Hendrix's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-12-24

Trond,

Our last frost date is usually June 15 and our first frost date may occur in late August.  Fortunately, we usually don't have a "cold snap" that would shock the plants while in full summer flourish.  Withstanding our cold summer nights seems to harden my many native and non-native species to frost.  Some can withstand 15 degrees of frost without damage to their blossoms or buds!  So even though we have below-freezing nights before June 15 and after late August, I have flowers blooming undamaged in the garden from late March through October.  I also think the rocks help a great deal by radiating absorbed daytime heat to the air surrounding the plants on those frosty nights.

Jane

Jane Hendrix
Mountain View Experimental Gardens
Peak 7-Breckenridge, Colorado USA.
Elev: 10,000 feet
Zone 4
http://www.picturetrail.com/hendrix & http://www.picturetrail.com/snowtrekker7

 

Hendrix
Hendrix's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-12-24

Thanks, Anne.  The blue drifts are Muscari armeniacum (Grape Hyacinth).

Jane

Jane Hendrix
Mountain View Experimental Gardens
Peak 7-Breckenridge, Colorado USA.
Elev: 10,000 feet
Zone 4
http://www.picturetrail.com/hendrix & http://www.picturetrail.com/snowtrekker7

 

Pages

Log in or register to post comments