Saussurea

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cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Looks healthy :) the tiny silver leaves on S cf leontodontoides      above are getting a tiny bit bigger, so I am hopeful...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
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Joined: 2009-10-27

So, what I am now growing this year as Saussurea nepalensis (first photo below) bears no resemblance at all to what I grew a few years ago (second photo, below)!   This is actually sort of encouraging, since the current plant looks much more like the available photos in a google search (Edit: hmm, not sure about that now).  Perhaps it has a better chance of survival - not a single one of what I grew earlier actually wintered-over (and I do wonder what heck it actually was?!?)

 

Do yours look like the first photo, Frances?

Here is this year's seedlings of locally-collected Saussurea nuda ssp. densa, starting to look a bit like their wild counterparts:    

Saussurea nupuripoensis, developing nicely:

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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Looking good, Lori! I'm quite fascinated by this genus along with other odd Asteraceae  ;D  I'm nervously watching for re-emergence of a couple I planted in the ground last fall-- they'd survived outdoors in sunk pots the year before... and I have seed of a couple more to sow...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Boland
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Joined: 2009-09-25

Lori, i think your mystery nepalense might be a Leibnitzia.  I have two Saussurea coming along as seedlings...nepalense and a N. spp. from Goteborg BG.  S. pygmaea from last year show no signs yet.

Todd Boland St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada Zone 5b 1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
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Joined: 2009-10-27

You must mean this year's, Todd?   Yes, it does look rather like Leibnitzia anandria, comparing to my photos.  More Leibnitzia is about the last thing I need  :rolleyes:; I guess time will tell.

So does your S. nepalensis looks like the one I grew before... ?  Could you post a photo, please?

 

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Boland
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I'll try to get a pic in the next day or so.  S. pygmaea survived the winter in the cold-frame and is showing the first leaves.  I'll plant it out next month and cross my fingers.

Todd Boland St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada Zone 5b 1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
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Joined: 2009-10-27

Something that seems unlike Leibnitzia anandria though, is the black stipples on the leaves of the S. "nepalensis" seedlings I'm growing.  At least I don't remember black stipples on Leibnitzia leaves... ?

(NB. The valid species name is Saussurea nepalensis, as opposed to S. nepalense).

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Boland
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The nepalensis are only in their seed leaves stage yet...I'll have to wait until true leaves appear.

Edit:  Correcting species name.

Todd Boland St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada Zone 5b 1800 mm precipitation per year

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Amazingly, given our cool weather, I finally noticed some small hints of growth on a couple of plants-- these are tiny things just planted out in the fall, though it was their second winter outside, first was in sunk pots..One was this Saussurea cf leontodontoides (from Holubec, I haven't found a picture of it as he found it). Interestingly, the real leontodontoides seems to be mostly green, tomentose only below, these so far are fully tomentose- all the better! Notice the black dead leaf from last year.. these new leaves are still tiny, less than an inch so far, the plant itself is supposed to be small anyway...I've planted several of these in a couple of places- these ones are in my semp bed in front of the house, which has fairly mineral soil (clay and gravel mostly) the others are in what I hope to be a moister, richer soil bed (still rocky and sharply sloped) so I will see which site they prefer!None of the other Saussureas are showing anything yet..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Howey
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Joined: 2010-05-17

Lori - apologies for not getting back sooner.  What I had growing as Saussurea nepalensis last year was the same as your second picture.  No sign of it this year but when those Sinelesis (which there is now no doubt that that is what they are) began popping up in that spot, I thought they were the Saussurea I had planted.  Strange that they are "popping up" all over the garden now quite distant from where I had planted Sinelesis originally - don't you think that is odd?  I loved your pictures of the "real" Saussurea.  Wonder why it didn't survive in my garden - perhaps it was because "winter" was interrupted this year (little snow cover) - I believe its native habitat is in the mountains (Himalayas).  Fran

Frances HoweyLondon, Ontario, CanadaZone 5b

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