Re: Alpines August 2012

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I grow Gentiana lutea but it doesn't bloom every year... as a matter of fact, it hasn't bloomed in some years, unfortunately.  :(  It is a large plant in a spot where it is slowly being encroached upon by a spruce, and is also probably drier than it would like; it needs to be moved, though I'm very hesitant to do so.  I've read that the roots are very large (used for flavoring liqueurs, interestingly), and from the disastrous results of moving much smaller plants years ago, I'm not looking forward to it!I would love to grow G. purpurea too.  I germinated a couple a while back but had no success at keeping them alive.

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tim, I successfully grow a meadow gentian - Gentiana purpurea. Unfortunately not in a scenic place like what Cliff shows us (bravo Cliff!)  ;)

G. purpurea is native to Norway but I have introduced it to our cabin in the subalpine zone (950m). I have collected plants from 3 different populations; the nearest not very far from here. They are growing in a meadow, previously used as a pasture. My plants selfsow and the population increase. However, it takes several years before seedlings flower. Seems that seeds germinate easily, at least in situ.

Here are a few of my plants. Notice the difference in flower development; they are from different populations. Seeds ripen late but I can try to collect some if you are interested.

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Nice plants Trond! Yes I would be interested in seed if and when... I wonder if it might be possible to establish this like you have in a grassy sward? I have an area of long grass with bulbs but it might be too much competition. Would be interesting to try good established plants in pots.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram Faversham, Kent, UK I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.  

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Re the Bolax gummifera  versus Azorella confusion: Azorella tricuspidata is a synonym for Bolax gummifera, whereas Azorella trifurcata is something else altogether.  Is there any wonder folks get muddled?!

P.S.  my Bolax is dead..... vine weevils and wet summers, I think, but my Azorella trifurcata is just fine.

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret) Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Trond, my Gentiana purpurea seedlings from your seed last year are looking quite happy, but I have yet to plant them out in this (for me) disastrous summer of hot-hot-hot drought followed by violent thunderstorms and tropical downpours where we lose power, got nothing done in the yard this whole weekend, scorching hot in the morning and early afternoon both weekend days, followed by violent storms where we lose power (for most of the weekend).  I think G. purpurea is a "stunner", I hope that it succeeds here, and thank you for the seeds.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15
Tim wrote:

Nice plants Trond! Yes I would be interested in seed if and when... I wonder if it might be possible to establish this like you have in a grassy sward? I have an area of long grass with bulbs but it might be too much competition. Would be interesting to try good established plants in pots.

Seedlings seem to cope well with grass. I have even tried sowing directly in the turf - in a place where the grass was thingrowing due to some shrubs, which I removed. It worked very well.

You are welcome, Mark. Hope your seedlings continue to look happy even with your totally different climate!

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Saxifraga umbellulata v. pectinata, finally opening its blossoms:  

Update on Plantago urvillei - the blossoms are pink now, and rather charming:  

Repeats, also, of Erigeron aureus and Acantholimon kotschyi ssp. laxispicata:    

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori, that is the COOLEST Plantago I ever did see!!!!  Where is it from?  I had no idea any Plantago had flowers of color, typically they are green to whitish.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Mark, the seeds were collected on Olkhon, Siberia (an island in Lake Baikal, http://olkhon.siberia.com/) in grassland.  (I got the seeds from Holubec, though they were collected by a third party, N. Nepriakhina.)http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl/record/tro-25200440I started the seeds this past winter; of several seedlings planted out, only this one is blooming.  The basal rosette is perfectly flat and 2" x 3.5", and the flower stems are 6" tall.  It's pretty cute at present!

Here's another one blooming from seed this past winter - Antirrhinum molle, a perennial snapdragon:  I hope some of these seedings will survive to replace my very old, worn out plant that has started declining from year to year.

My anemic, little mystery plant has turned out to be Mimulus cardinalis... must have been old seeds in the reused soil, I guess:  

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Saxifraga umbellulata - a tiny gem! Anthirrinum molle looks interesting. Something to seek out.Plantago urvillei looks very similar to the native P. media, which is common here and regarded (by me at least) as the most gardenworthy species of the native ones. Maybe P. urvillei is a little more refined.

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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