Ranunculus andersonii

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

James, I didn't even know of this gorgeous Ranunculus before your posting, thanks so much for bringing it to the forefront, it shows that there are some North American Ranunculi that vie for honors with the revered European alpine Ranunculus species.  Now, the New Zealand Ranunculi, that's another story :D

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Wow, that is an extraordinary plant!  I'm surprised too to see that it's North American... I had no idea!

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Thanks for the picture links, Mark.  What a dazzling plant in bloom and the buds are equally beautiful. 

Peter George
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-09-03
RickR wrote:

Peter wrote:

Ranunculus seed is usually ephemeral.

Apparently, Ranunculus gramineas is one of the exceptions.  I received seed through NARGS, planted in late February, and the seed emerged in late summer as it is supposed to.

How many of us have had similar experiences with Ranunculus seed? I once had several R. glacialis seed from NARGS seedex germinate, but otherwise I've never had any germination.

Peter George, Petersham, MA (north central MA, close to the NH/VT borders), zones 5b and 6 around the property.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I found another photo, showing a somewhat unusual form with spaced propeller-like petals.http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/view?q=%22Ranunculus+andersonii%22&psc=G&...

In Flora of North America (FONA), where the genus Ranunculus is divided into subgenera, R. andersonii is placed in Subg. Crymodes along with only one other species, R. glacialis.  FONA does not separately recognize R. andersonii var. tenellus, whereas the USDA Profile pages does recognize the variety.  http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=310008  http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=RAAN

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Peter wrote:

RickR wrote:

Peter wrote:

Ranunculus seed is usually ephemeral.

Apparently, Ranunculus gramineas is one of the exceptions.  I received seed through NARGS, planted in late February, and the seed emerged in late summer as it is supposed to.

How many of us have had similar experiences with Ranunculus seed? I once had several R. glacialis seed from NARGS seedex germinate, but otherwise I've never had any germination.

The only ranunculus germination "success" that springs to mind for me is the a few Ranunculus sceleratus that popped up the year before last...  :P   Not sure if the seed came in the seed exchange packets or in the potting soil.

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

I usually get excellent germination with FRESH SEED of Ranunculus glacialis, R. seguieri, R. alpestris and other European species and occasional germination with stored seed. This pattern is often repeated with New Zealand and North American seed (when fresh seed is available from excellent friends) - the major problem has been (and probably will always be) growing those little seedlings on to flowering size.  European and New Zealand high alpine buttercups are hardy, but young seedlings seem very susceptible (in my U.K. environment) to all manner of problems.  I manage to grow on about 2 per cent of my R. glacialis seeds and about 10 per cent of my R.seguieri seeds ... New Zealand buttercups can vary between 20 per cent of R. insignis to 1 per cent of R. haastii.  Ranunculus parnassifolius and R.alpestris are much easier and equally beautiful.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus On the moors in Lancashire, U.K. Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Seasons greetings to forum members ... may you all enjoy a happy, healthy and floriferous New Year.

Ranunculus glacialis (or, as some maintain, Beckwithia glacialis)  :D

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus On the moors in Lancashire, U.K. Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Although the red ones I pictured was nice I think the white ones takes the cake! Nice pic, Cliff!I second the greeting: May all of you experience a green and floriferous new year!

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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