Onosma and Lindelofia

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Boland
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Joined: 2009-09-25

Lindelofia longifolia also reaches close to 3 feet...perhaps better suited to a perennial border but it looks OK if the rockery is large enough.

I have a rock wall with super drainage and relatively little snow cover all winter...I'll try my drylanders there to see if they could be a go.  Right now the plants there are pretty basic...mainly because it is roght along the sidewalk...I don;t knwo if iI'd want to grow anything too rare there!

Todd Boland St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada Zone 5b 1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Boland wrote:

Right now the plants there are pretty basic...mainly because it is roght along the sidewalk...I don;t knwo if iI'd want to grow anything too rare there!

On the other hand, it will be protected by its relative obscurity.  :)

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Boland
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Joined: 2009-09-25

Considering I live on such a busy street and there is lots of pedestrian traffic since there is a convenience store nearby, I have yet (touch wood) had a problem with people ripping up the plants along the rock wall.  I'm sure the locals would not recognize a plant as 'rare'.  I do have a Ramonda under the Potentilla at the end of the wall and so far, so good.

Todd Boland St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada Zone 5b 1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Yes, I know what you're saying.  We live on a relatively busy corner; the front street is a bus route, as well as the way to a little shopping mall, and there is a playground behind us down the side street.  We, unfortunately, do get a bit of what we think of as "vandalism" every year... ranging from quite innocent to intentional (though nothing really serious).  It does sometimes target showier plants, e.g. evil hellspawn child whacking off tulips with stick, young babysitter advising her juvenile charges to pick lilies, etc.. (I must have the patience of a saint, given that I have not yet installed land mines.  ::))  It doesn't normally affect any of the plants that I actually prize, thankfully.  I don't expect anyone knows what any of them are anyway!

It looks like you have a very nice rock wall there.  (Not to mention an ample expanse of lawn for future projects...  ;))

Here is Onosma sericea stellulata, which I grew from seed years ago, and which has been hardy here.  Be careful when you do spring clean-up around Onosma - the bristly hairs on the dried leaves and stems are like cactus glochids.   :o

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

A very interesting and attractive plant there, Mark.Here's another Rindera species from the Pavelka site, Rindera caespitosa: http://www.pavelkaalpines.cz/Photos/Garden2008/rinderacaespitosa.html

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
Skulski wrote:

A very interesting and attractive plant there, Mark.Here's another Rindera species from the Pavelka site, Rindera caespitosa: http://www.pavelkaalpines.cz/Photos/Garden2008/rinderacaespitosa.html

Wow, thanks for that one, fantastic, a lovely plant.  But now I'm confused more than ever about Rindera and Paracaryum, both being obscure genera of plants,  The links I provided of Rindera lanata show plants with heavily ciliolate involucres, the species with fairly consistent pink petals, but with trademark insanely silvered and wiskered pedicels and involucres that hold the flowers, almost more of a show than the flowers themselves.  In the one link I provided of Greek Rindera graeca, and in your R. caespitosa example, I see plants that look like Paracaryum, with showy flowers clear of the calyx lobes.  In fact, many of these boraginaceous delights seem to be assigned to one genus or another depending on author and what day of the week it is  ;)

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Although Onosma alboroseum is a bit bristly, I never found it to be so stiff (or bloodletting) as cactus thorns.  At least that is my experience.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Absolutely right, not like cactus thorns at all, but the dried bristles on Onosma stellulatum stick in the skin and cause the sort of irritation similar to that caused by cactus glochids... I try to remember to wear gloves.  :)

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Kelaidis
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Mark: you have made major botanical history by hybridizing two borages (Lindelofia and Rindera) to produce a shrub in the Lauraceae. I think this is Nobel Prize level hybridization indeed. No wonder you're so lightheaded! You have indeed turned a page of botanical history! We need a newer, more glorious Avatar.

I grew Rindera lanata for several years at Eudora (from Archibald seed) and have some transparencies I ought to scan: it's terrific, although not as stunning in flower as it is emerging from the ground as a great wooly ball of fuzzy glory. I collected seed of yet another Rindera in Kazakhstan last summer: huge, papery seedpods unlike any other borage. Hopefully these will produce plants!

As long as you're producing such spectacular crosses, how about a gentian blue rose or a

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
Kelaidis wrote:

Mark: you have made major botanical history by hybridizing two borages (Lindelofia and Rindera) to produce a shrub in the Lauraceae. I think this is Nobel Prize level hybridization indeed. No wonder you're so lightheaded! You have indeed turned a page of botanical history! We need a newer, more glorious Avatar.

I grew Rindera lanata for several years at Eudora (from Archibald seed) and have some transparencies I ought to scan: it's terrific, although not as stunning in flower as it is emerging from the ground as a great wooly ball of fuzzy glory. I collected seed of yet another Rindera in Kazakhstan last summer: huge, papery seedpods unlike any other borage. Hopefully these will produce plants!

As long as you're producing such spectacular crosses, how about a gentian blue rose or a

OK, I got the hint... so I go back to my previous posting to find out where you're getting the Lauraceae reference, then spotted it... dohHHH!  Not only once but twice I slipped up and wrote Lindera instead of Rindera... aarrggghhhh!  But now that you made the suggestion, I might begin looking into such a cross. ;D

Working on a new Avatar.

Can't wait to see if you get good results on your Rindera in Kazakhstan.  Did you see any intergeneric crosses between Rindera & Lindera while in Kazakhstan?... I think these are called x RindeLindera.  ;D ;D

By the way, for those who want to get a plant of Paracayum racemosum, I see it available from Beaver Creek Greenhouses (shipping to USA & Canada), Plants of Paracaryum racemosum v. racemosum, Askale - Turkey, Zone 4, $6.00.http://www.rockgardenplants.com/plantcatmain.htm

Photo: Paracaryum racemosumhttp://www.ozgurdoga.net/aciklamacicek/Paracaryum_racemosum.htm

Wrightman Alpines also has Paracaryum racemosum:http://www.wrightmanalpines.com/details.asp?PRODUCT_ID=P173

Rocky Mountain Rare Plants has seed, check out the 2nd photo link, it'll knock you socks off... looks different than the previous pics of Paracaryum racemosum.  Their seed list is now closed for the summer, one can hope for next years catalog.http://www.rmrp.com/Catalog/CatalogContentP.htmhttp://www.rmrp.com/Photo%20Pages/PP/Paracaryum%20racemosum001_ZZ100DPI.htm

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

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