Olympic Mountains

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Sellars
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

Stephen:

The photos were taken over an elevation range of about 1800 to 2000 m. The deep winter snow cover in the Olympic Mountains takes a long time to melt in some years.  This year, 2011 was unusual in the Pacific Northwest with a cold wet spring and cool early summer and the road to Obstruction Point was not free of snow until the first week of August. Some alpine areas in the North Cascades are still snow-covered which is frustrating for hikers in our area.

David Sellars From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada Feature your favourite hikes at: www.mountainflora.ca MountainFlora videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/MountainFlora

Barstow
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-08-27

Thanks, David!

I remember being astonished to find the high elevation Lodgepole Pine forest in the Sierra Nevada (California) deep in snow in August one year and I understood this was simply due to the enormous amounts of El-Nino related precipitation that winter. I wonder how the trees cope with this?

Stephen Barstow Malvik, Norway 63.4N Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15
Stephenb wrote:

Thanks, David!

I remember being astonished to find the high elevation Lodgepole Pine forest in the Sierra Nevada (California) deep in snow in August one year and I understood this was simply due to the enormous amounts of El-Nino related precipitation that winter. I wonder how the trees cope with this?

If the soil is not frozen solid under the snow the trees have no problem. They can transport water through their tissue and grow well. I have often seen birches leafing out in deep snow.

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Awesome pics, awesome post. 8)

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

Howey
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-05-17

Hi David:  Have never been to the Olympic Mts. but used to enjoy watching them across the water from Victoria - some days they weren't even there but on other days they were so large and clear you felt you could almost touch them - quite a sight.  They, along with the native Dogwood, were frequent subjects for local artists.  Our high school sport teams were called Cascades, Selkirks and Olympics - and I was an Olympic.  A trip on the ferry (Kalakala or Chinook) to Port Angeles and Lake ?  was and probably still is a popular excursion for the folks out there.  Fran

Frances HoweyLondon, Ontario, CanadaZone 5b

Howey
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-05-17

Just remembered the name of the Lake near Port Angeles (Olympic mts.)  - Crescent Lake.  Sometimes it takes a bit longer to remember things than it used to.  Guess Cape Flattery is a fertile spot for botanizing?  Fran

Frances HoweyLondon, Ontario,CanadaZone 5b

Sellars
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

Fran:  It's years since we went out to the coast on the Olympic Peninsula.  We always head straight up Hurricane Ridge as the road access to the alpine areas is superb and there are lots of hikes in the area.  We have also hiked up Mount Townsend at the east end of the range.

On this last trip we had a good view of Victoria and Vancouver Island from the top of Elk Mountain - though not as good as the spectacular view of the Olympics from Victoria!

David Sellars From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada Feature your favourite hikes at: www.mountainflora.ca MountainFlora videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/MountainFlora

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