New Zealand Alpine Flora

444 posts / 0 new
Last post
Howey
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-05-17

Toolie:  What gorgeous pictures of some gorgeous plants.  I have always wanted to grow Geum uniflorum - have tried several times with seed (not too easy to obtain) with no luck.  Can you give me some advice about growing them up here in Eastern Canada?  I have planted some Ranunculus lyallii in a tiny bog - it will get a lot of snow cover - and wonder if that will do the "trick".   

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Magnificent set of photographs once again, Dave ... oh that BEAUTIFUL Ranunculus buchananii ...  :D :D :D

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Booker wrote:

Magnificent set of photographs once again, Dave ... oh that BEAUTIFUL Ranunculus buchananii ...  :D :D :D

Just about the perfect Ranunculi Cliff. ;)

Howey wrote:

Toolie:  What gorgeous pictures of some gorgeous plants.  I have always wanted to grow Geum uniflorum - have tried several times with seed (not too easy to obtain) with no luck.  Can you give me some advice about growing them up here in Eastern Canada?  I have planted some Ranunculus lyallii in a tiny bog - it will get a lot of snow cover - and wonder if that will do the "trick".   

Thanks Fran

Not sure what your overall climatic conditions are but would presume if you experience any summer draught that could be a problem .

Geum uniflorum has preference for shady moist banks ,although in the southern end of Fiordland where moisture is year round and totals over 6 metres p.a. it will also be found out in the open on depleted vegetative spots.I've noted my diary to collect a little seed for you soon which i'll send fresh.Will be in touch.

Ranunculus lyallii also has a liking moist areas--from streamsides to old established fellfield,(large rock rumble)---in areas not so wet ,they grow where the foliage is in shade and the flowering heads in the sun.

Cheers dave.

 

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Hoy wrote:

But am I right when I believe new Zealand has few red and blue flowered plants? Think I once read something about that.

Sorry Trond
I just realised i haven't replied to your earlier question.

NZ alpine flowers are mostly whites and yellows, with a few blues and one or two reds like Raoulia buchananii.

I'm not sure of the reasons why ,although as i have discovered over the years ,(especially when i have been in close taking macro shots),there are many genera that are scented ---ranging from Brachyglottis,Myosotis,Leptinella and Aciphylla ,(to name just a few off the top of my head),so maybe scent is of more importance ....?

Cheers dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Dave
I have been reading an article about insect pollinators in New Zealand. I wonder if the predominance of flies as the primary pollinators in many areas influences flower color. Since flies (as far as I know) are more attuned to scent cues versus visual cues.

http://www.newzealandecology.org/nzje/free_issues/NZJEcol1_66.pdf

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Toole wrote:

Hoy wrote:

But am I right when I believe new Zealand has few red and blue flowered plants? Think I once read something about that.

Sorry Trond
I just realised i haven't replied to your earlier question.

NZ alpine flowers are mostly whites and yellows, with a few blues and one or two reds like Raoulia buchananii.

I'm not sure of the reasons why ,although as i have discovered over the years ,(especially when i have been in close taking macro shots),there are many genera that are scented ---ranging from Brachyglottis,Myosotis,Leptinella and Aciphylla ,(to name just a few off the top of my head),so maybe scent is of more importance ....?

Cheers dave.

Thanks, Dave! I haven't had time checking till now anyway, have had a trip to England last week (Univerity of Reading by the way). I think I have read the same as John about pollinating insects. And you are probably right about scent.

Your last pictures were fabulous, dave! The landscape is a little familiar - not unlike some places in Norway - but the vegetation and flowers are all different! My body itches to walk in such places.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Spent today showing 8 Danish folk a few 'weeds'  ;D   down at sea level --while i expected that most plants would be past flowering I knew Gentianella saxosa would be just starting.

Their preferred habitat is in gravel a meter or two above the high tide mark exposed to the elements of full sun, near constant wind and the effects of salt spray.

Being a relatively calm,sunny day there was quite a bit of insect activity which i managed to capture by changing over cameras.

I initially had limited success with this sps in the garden here. However planting out in an experimental sand crevice garden has seen it's stay more permanent and while it seeds around, is never a pest, unfortunately in our shady conditions they never achieve the tight clumps as in nature.

Cheers Dave.  
 

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Beautiful images as always Dave.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Dave, I wouldn't complain if such plants grew at the beach!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

The NZAGS had its annual field trip a weekend back. A few images from the mountains of South Canterbury.

Celmisia angustifolia comes in green and silver leaved forms.

Wahlenbergia albomarginata is often seen as a running growth --this pic is of a nice clumping plant.

A small Anisotome sps in fellfield--- possibly a male form of A. flexuosa.

[attachthumb =3]

Anisotome flexuosa --female.

On fine scree Epilobium pycnostachyum.

The wind was so strong even the locals were grounded.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Pages

Log in or register to post comments