Miscellaneous Woodlanders

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

cohan wrote:

BTW, I wonder if paniculata would be considered ephemeral in a longer/hotter summer? By the time they are dying down here, summer is over anyway!

I've never noticed if M. paniculata goes summer dormant in Northern Minnesota.  I haven't traversed areas where it is at that time of year.  While it did go dormant near St. Paul, MN (southcentral MN), I am not sure if it was because of the heat or the dry.  It was planted on an oak forested hillside with a gravel/sand subsoil.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I don't find that M. paniculata goes dormant here in the garden, and where it grows in natural spots along the bike path, I think I see it all through the summer too - there, it's on a shaded steep slope that has many springs.  I'll have to pay more attention this year to confirm that.

As I think about it, it was probably a lot more than 3 years ago that M. ciliata stopped going dormant in my yard... I can't think of any particular weather pattern that coincided.  It's strange, anyway.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

RickR wrote:

Mertensia virginica (Virginia Bluebells) is fairly common among shade gardeners here, although fairly difficult to find in nurseries.   It is well loved, and though it is native in Minnesota, it is only abundant in the very southeast portion of the state.  Some gardeners find it a bit weedy, but easy to control, while most are delighted with the gentle self seeding.  Two State parks are especially famous for their natural ephemeral wildflowers, and each have quarter acre areas of mostly Virginia bluebells, with Erythronium spp., Enemion (Isopyrum) biternatum, Thalictrum spp., Asarum canadense, Uvularia grandiflora, etc.  They are truly a sight to see.

Mertensia paniculata grows in the northern half of Minnesota, and I grew a plant at my parents (along with Mertensia virginca) for many years when I was growing up. Some years after I moved out, my brother (the machinist turned self proclaimed naturalist) destroyed it while it was dormant, replacing it with Wild Ginger.   :'(  Our form has a much more metalic blue color that practically sparkles, rather than your matte baby blue, Cohan.  The shape is more rigid and regular, too.

This was a very interesting discussing about Mertensia. Thank all authors. By the way: Rick, did you forgive your brother?

Gerrit

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Skulski wrote:

I don't find that M. paniculata goes dormant here in the garden, and where it grows in natural spots along the bike path, I think I see it all through the summer too - there, it's on a shaded steep slope that has many springs.  I'll have to pay more attention this year to confirm that.

M paniculata grows in sunny, shady, wet and dry places here; none of them go dormant before fall frosts, but summer is so short I hardly think it counts...lol.. I can't think offhand of any native plants in my area that go dormant before summer is over.. why would they?..lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

gerrit wrote:

By the way: Rick, did you forgive your brother?
Gerrit

I would blow up if I held grudges. 

There's the time he fell a large ash tree and destroyed my only two Paw Paw trees; when he decided to clear the part of the woods one fall where I had planted fruiting Viburnum trilobum and Liparis lilifolia, and where Galearis (Orchis) spectabilis grew naturally; when he decided to cut down some ancient and very picturesque native Nanyberry Viburnum understory trees; when he decide it was a good idea to cut all the forest edge small trees and shrubs so he could see into the woods -- it let so much light in that it is now a tangle of invasive buckthorn and the wildflowers that used to thrive there are all but gone....shall I go on? (This would be a whole chapter if I were to write a memoir.)

Oh, and the crème de la crème: we use to have a small hillside where morel mushrooms grew.  He decided to build a road for the tractor there.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Oh my! one man destroyer of the forest! ;)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Well Rick, I'm looking forward to read your memoirs. It's clear you have talent. (and of course a brother)

Thanks for posting this 'funny' story.

Gerrit.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Well, Rick, I am glad he isn't my brother - or rather that my sister hasn't done anything like that yet :o

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Some Calanthes flowering here:

Calanthe tricarinata
and Calanthe hancockii

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Nice Calanthes, Wim.

I have tried some in my woodland but they are prone to slug damage.

However, this blue corydalis is unaffected by slugs.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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