Miscellaneous Woodlanders

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

One of the better short Polygonatums from China (and Russia) is Polygonatum acuminatifoliumhttp://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200027841

A friend of mine bought this as Blanchette Nursery nearby (Carlisle Massachusetts), I hear that he has an excellent selection of Polygonatum species and cultivars. 

This one has the cutest boxy white green-tipped flowers and very neat short growth under a foot (< 30 cm).  So far is has spread but moderately.  I have earmarked a piece for you Aaron :)

 

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Mark, I fully agree! Although I grow several Polygonatums I don't have this one and it is one of the better I've seen!

Neat and rather large flowers. Wonderful ;)

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

AmyO
AmyO's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-06
Hoy wrote:

Mark, I fully agree! Although I grow several Polygonatums I don't have this one and it is one of the better I've seen!

Neat and rather large flowers. Wonderful ;)

I am in agreement too! Beautiful large flowers on a good sized plant! I'll be sowing seed of Polygonatum biflorum..should I soak these first or sow just sow & stratify?

Amy Olmsted Hubbardton, VT, Zone 4

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
AmyO wrote:

I'll be sowing seed of Polygonatum biflorum..should I soak these first or sow just sow & stratify?

Not sure about sowing Polygonatum seed, I have no experience growing them from seed, but I'm sure someone else here will be able to answer; I'm anxious to learn how to grow these from seed too.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21
AmyO wrote:

I'll be sowing seed of Polygonatum biflorum..should I soak these first or sow just sow & stratify?

Deno says:

P. biflourum seeds collected in October. Washed in water and cleaned with three rinses with water daily for 7 days, and placed outdoors germinated 90% in May-June.  None germinated in 70F with light, 70F in dark or 40-70 (3 months at 40F then 3 months at 70F).

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

AmyO
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-06
RickR wrote:

AmyO wrote:

I'll be sowing seed of Polygonatum biflorum..should I soak these first or sow just sow & stratify?

Deno says:

P. biflourum seeds collected in October. Washed in water and cleaned with three rinses with water daily for 7 days, and placed outdoors germinated 90% in May-June.  None germinated in 70F with light, 70F in dark or 40-70 (3 months at 40F then 3 months at 70F).

Thanks Rick! ;D Outdoors they go! I love this forum...I always something new! :)

Amy Olmsted Hubbardton, VT, Zone 4

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Amy, have you remembered rinsing the seeds several times a day for a week ;)

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Afloden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-15

With Polygonatum there have been a few germination studies to facilitate their production for vegetables in Asia. In all cases (P. cirrhifolium, P. macranthum, and P. odoratum) cleaned seed stored cool for 30-40 days, then warmth for 60-90 and then cool/cold again for the same duration gave a green leaf upon warmth again. This means a whole 2 seasons are gotten through in the first year. I have flowered verticillate species in 3 years this way.

  There are exceptions to this; Polygonatum punctatum will germinate immediately and form a root and shortly thereafter it will put up a leaf. There are several related species and as yet unnamed that do this also.

Aaron

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Afloden wrote:

... cleaned seed stored cool for 30-40 days...

To clarify, when you say "stored cool", I take it you mean seed sowed in or on a moist medium (not dry storage)?

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-08-27
Afloden wrote:

With Polygonatum there have been a few germination studies to facilitate their production for vegetables in Asia. In all cases (P. cirrhifolium, P. macranthum, and P. odoratum) cleaned seed stored cool for 30-40 days, then warmth for 60-90 and then cool/cold again for the same duration gave a green leaf upon warmth again. This means a whole 2 seasons are gotten through in the first year. I have flowered verticillate species in 3 years this way.

Aaron: Do you have any references to cultivation of Polygonatum as vegetable in Asia. I have various references to their wild collection as vegetables, but can't recall seeing anything about their cultivation for food, although I haven't searched very hard...

Thanks

Stephen Barstow Malvik, Norway 63.4N Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

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