Miscellaneous Woodlanders

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Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I am a little jealous of this one, Mark, as I've said before. Never seen it except here.

Today i have planted some Trilliums in a new bed - or an old one which I cleared of overgrown shrubs. I have to look for Scoliopus too!

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31
Toole wrote:

Hello Wim

That's very kind of you --maybe we could arrange a swop for a some Trillium seed.

I've noted my diary and will PM closer to the time .

Cheers Dave.

That would be very nice, Dave. Thanks

Wim BoensWingene Belgium zone 8a
Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Recent view of Japanese Shrub Mint or Leucosceptrum stellipilum, at its peak on these very warm days of October 2011.  In the background is Eupatorium rugosum 'Chocolate'.

Eupatorium rugosum 'Chocolate' is one of the finest native species and selections for shady autumn garden.  All season long the foliage is a very dark chocolate color, somewhat lightening up by fall, then a long season of fresh white flowers.  Grows about 3' tall.http://www.northcreeknurseries.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/plants.plantDeta...

Of the many Asters in bloom now (Symphyotrichum and other astery-micro-split genera), the most common is Aster cordifolius, the Blue Wood Aster.  While having a somewhat uniform and familiar appearance from afar, it is incredibly variable when observed at close hand.  It can be weedy, in fact, the edges of woodlands and stone walls that line rural streets here in New England, can become a haze of smokey lavender blue from this species' profusion.  In the past I allowed too many seedlings in my garden, so it has to be kept in check, which is easy enough... just allow some to grow in spots here and there for 6 weeks or more of cheerful display.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Mark - I learn so much from this Forum! Leucosceptrum is completely new to me, even though I have a Japanese friend who often gives me native floras. I have just looked to see if it is in the Plantfinder and Crug Farm in North Wales list wild collected forms. They grow many amazing plants but do get a little more rain than we do in Kent!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram Faversham, Kent, UK I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.  

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I have to pay Crûg Farm Nursery a visit once, they have a lot of interesting plants -and don't dispatch to Norway! A pity.I have been wanting that Leucosceptrum ever since Mark showed it the first time.

I once had Aster cordifolius too; now I wonder what has happened to it, haven't seen it this fall.Euptorium certainly is more than the one I know of!

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
Hoy wrote:

I have to pay Crûg Farm Nursery a visit once, they have a lot of interesting plants -and don't dispatch to Norway! A pity.I have been wanting that Leucosceptrum ever since Mark showed it the first time.

I'll have to pay attention to the spikes of Leucosceptrum, to see if there are late maturing seeds within those scale-like bracts.  If we have a long mild autumn/early winter, and a reasonable amount of dryness, there's a possibility for sufficient time for seed to form.  For 2 of the last 3 years I got seed on Kirengeshoma palmata, even a few self sown seedlings... the first ever to appear.

Trond, did you notice on that Japanese nursery link you gave on the Allium 2011 topic, that they offer 2 named forms of Leucoceptrum japonicum!  They do international shipping, although they don't give much in the way of details about that fact.http://yuzawa-engei.net/11English/08Leontopodium/Leontopodium_page.html

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15
McDonough wrote:

Trond, did you notice on that Japanese nursery link you gave on the Allium 2011 topic, that they offer 2 named forms of Leucoceptrum japonicum!  They do international shipping, although they don't give much in the way of details about that fact.http://yuzawa-engei.net/11English/08Leontopodium/Leontopodium_page.html

Yes Mark, I noticed and have done something too ;)

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Afloden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-15

Mark and others,

Kirengeshoma is a superb genus that I do not grow, or I should say, have not been successful in keeping alive. Would love to try it again now that I live in a gardening climate.

The two species, koreana and palmata, really are distinct both in morphology and genetically. From the authors a recent paper on the phylogeography of the genus; "it [koreana] differs, however, by a hexagonal green(vs quadrangular purplish) stem, denser trichomes, paler and fewer flowers, and elongated stigmas." Qiu et al., New Phytologist (2009) 183: 480–495. Their phylogeny and haplotype data suggests both species should be recognized with P. koreana being the older species and the Chinese and Japanese palmata more recently diverged.

Strangely I did not have a single paper on the genus saved to my extensive pdf library! Must be misplaced somewhere in all the files. Also, I did not realize that palmata is only known from 7 populations and koreana from a single mountain which contains a single population!

Aaron

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Interesting, Aaron, neither did I know they were that rare. I am looking for koreana!

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
Afloden wrote:

Mark and others,

Kirengeshoma is a superb genus that I do not grow, or I should say, have not been successful in keeping alive. Would love to try it again now that I live in a gardening climate.

The two species, koreana and palmata, really are distinct both in morphology and genetically. From the authors a recent paper on the phylogeography of the genus; "it [koreana] differs, however, by a hexagonal green(vs quadrangular purplish) stem, denser trichomes, paler and fewer flowers, and elongated stigmas." Qiu et al., New Phytologist (2009) 183: 480–495. Their phylogeny and haplotype data suggests both species should be recognized with P. koreana being the older species and the Chinese and Japanese palmata more recently diverged.

Strangely I did not have a single paper on the genus saved to my extensive pdf library! Must be misplaced somewhere in all the files. Also, I did not realize that palmata is only known from 7 populations and koreana from a single mountain which contains a single population!

Aaron

I'd love to find information that clearly delineate these two species; I believe that is the source of the problem, there is precious little accessible information that makes the difference between these two species clear.  In my informal google research, there is some belief that there is only one variable species.  I have not heard nor realized that the native distribution of the two species is so perilously restricted, I hadn't had that impression when doing casual research.  I had done lots of research previously, but in a more brief effort tonight, here are some links to technical papers that include information on native distribution of the 2 species.  Some links are "for-purchase" papers, but one can read the "abstract" or summaries of the papers to get an idea of content.  I know that I previously saw many other pages that showed plant species distribution, but here are a few:

http://www.springerimages.com/Images/LifeSciences/1-10.1007_s10265-006-0...

"Predicting the Distribution of Three Vulnerable Japanese, Plants: Rosa hirtula, Kirengeshoma palmata, and Salicornia europaea"http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=kiengeshoma%20distribution&source=web&cd=5&ved=0CD0QFjAE&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nies.go.jp%2Fs4_impact%2Fpdf%2F20091118_Conlisk.pdf&ei=Uy4WT4yZMIeK2QXW5KCOAg&usg=AFQjCNEWdmqimvpsPPFzQyGWZT0YPuUDuA

"Molecular phylogeography of East Asian Kirengeshoma (Hydrangeaceae) in relation to Quaternary climate change and landbridge configurations"http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2009.02876.x/pdf

"Genetic diversity of the endangered species Kirengeshoma palmata (Saxifragaceae) in China"(a for-purchase document)http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305197805001675

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

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