Miscellaneous Woodlanders

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AmyO
AmyO's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-12-06

What a gorgeous flower! I've never seen that one offered.....if you get enough seed to share keep me in mind please  ;D

Amy Olmsted Hubbardton, VT, Zone 4

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Amy

as you are the first to ask I will certainly hope to be able to send you some.

At the moment I do not know what the capsules contain but previous experience shows that if no seed is set the capsules shrivel and this has not happened so far. Fingers crossed!

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02
Tony wrote:

My A. macrophylla 'White Swan' has bloomed well this year and looks to have set a good crop of seed. I am already wondering what the off spring will look like. A poor picture but the only one I have

Very very nice Tony. :-*  ;D

The leaves of Wild Ginger (Asarum caudatum) tend to be a bit tatty after winter however its wonderful flowers at this time of the year more than make up for that . :)I understand the leaves give off a sweet ginger fragrance if bruised--must try that out this weekend.....

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill Bottom of the South Island New Zealand Zone 8 maritime climate 1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a. Nil snow cover

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Dave, just love the flowers on Asarum, they're so shy and whimsical.  A. caudatum is one of my favorites here.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Continuing on the Kirengeshoma front, buds on K. koreana finally opened, not sure if its flowering so late because its a young nursery-grown potted plant (now planted in the garden) or whether it is naturally so late flowering, waiting until September.  With all the rain that we've had this season, K. palmata is flowering more than ever, a full 2 months of flowering!  I'm convinced the buds that form at leaf internodes are indeterminate; that is, a seemingly unlimited number of buds can continue forming as long as conditions allow and promote such floriferous behavior.

Here is a recent shot of K. palmata on the left, show more outfacing flared bells; in the background is the foliage of Saruma henryi.  The middle and right-hand photo are of K. koreana; the flowers more distinctly nodding, remaining more closed and incurved, lovely when lifted up (as I've done in the photos) to see the overlapping petal twist... the flowers on both are thick and waxy.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Great photos, everyone. 

Mark and others who have contributed, I am really glad you're keeping up on the K. palmata vs. K. koreana subject.  It is very helpful.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Thanks Rick.

Unless there's another surprise flush of flowers, Kirengeshoma palmata has put on its final hurrah, just a couple waxy flared flowers left for the season.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

WimB
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Saxifraga 'Sugar Plum Fairy' is flowering here now. The correct cultivar name is: 'Cherry Pie'

Wim BoensWingene Belgium zone 8a
Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Wim, is that a Saxifraga fortunei hybrid or selection?  Beautiful deep color, and most valuable for the late flowering.  What can you tell us about 'Sugar Plum Fairy'?

A local NARGS member, Jim Jones, has been selecting pink form of S. fortunei and they are delightful, although mostly his are a softer pink.  I moved mine this year as it was swamped by more aggressive neighboring plants, but in its new hasn't done much... will have to go out and look to see if any buds are showing; here it flowers VERY late; usually October.  The color on mine however is very pale, looking white in photos, but it is actually a blush pink. Here are two photos from October 2008.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31
McDonough wrote:

Wim, is that a Saxifraga fortunei hybrid or selection?  Beautiful deep color, and most valuable for the late flowering.  What can you tell us about 'Sugar Plum Fairy'?

Mark,

It's a Japanese S. fortunei cultivar (not a hybrid). The original Japanese name is Saxifraga fortunei 'Toujya' (literally: Plum Happiness), but most of these Japanese cultivars have been given English names when they were exported to the UK or the States. These Saxifrages are very good for bringing color in the shade garden when almost nothing else is flowering... I fell in love with them last year while looking at this site: https://www.alpine-peters.de/shop/saxifraga/cortusifolia.html.

P.S. While looking at Jürgen Peters site again I see he sells 'Sugar Plum Fairy' too but it looks completely different to mine  :rolleyes: :rolleyes: I'll have to look into that!

Wim BoensWingene Belgium zone 8a

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