Miscellaneous Woodlanders

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cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

The draping displays them nicely... some patches are in flower here, though most seem to be just in bud last I looked.. they rarely get space to themselves though, and have to be viewed through other vegetation.. There are many places where they grow in mowed areas--fine for the plants, but i'm not always successful avoiding the flowers....

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
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Joined: 2009-09-21
cohan wrote:

they [Linnaea borealis] rarely get space to themselves though, and have to be viewed through other vegetation.. There are many places where they grow in mowed areas--fine for the plants, but i'm not always successful avoiding the flowers....

In northern Minnesota where I see Twinflower commonly, I find  them most often in  pine needle duff where surface vegetation and understory are sparse.  They virtually have the whole place to themselves!  This is also where Pipsissewa (Chimaphila umbellata) grows.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

WimB
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I've been very busy during the last couple of weeks so it seems I have a lot to catch up to on this forum.

Lori, love your shadeplants, especially the Arisaema and the twinflowers.Cohan, your pot full of Tiarella seedlings look as if they are really enjoying themselves.

Here are some shade lovers which are flowering here now.

The white form of Anemonopsis macrophylla (sometimes sold as cv. 'White Swan')Arisaema candidissimumArisaema fargesiiArisaema speciosumArisaema tortuosaDeinanthe caeruleaEpipactis giganteaand Primula florindae

Wim BoensWingene Belgium zone 8a
cohan
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RickR wrote:

cohan wrote:

they [Linnaea borealis] rarely get space to themselves though, and have to be viewed through other vegetation.. There are many places where they grow in mowed areas--fine for the plants, but i'm not always successful avoiding the flowers....

In northern Minnesota where I see Twinflower commonly, I find  them most often in  pine needle duff where surface vegetation and understory are sparse.  They virtually have the whole place to themselves!  This is also where Pipsissewa (Chimaphila umbellata) grows.

If I ever finish posting pics from my one day in the mts, lol,  I will show some of the Linnaea here in the yard, and surrounding woods where they grow in any kind of soil and moisture conditions except standing water, nor are they common in the driest under spruce spots (the only places we have with barish ground).. they are common under and among grasses, shrubs, and numerous forbs with mosses, lichens and fungi as well

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

A very nice Arisaema collection, Whim!  (Arisaema speciosum gives me the giggles.) :D

A pic from a previous year, my Deinanthe caerulea has a yellow, twisty stigma.

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

WimB
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RickR wrote:

A very nice Arisaema collection, Whim!  (Arisaema speciosum gives me the giggles.) :D

A pic from a previous year, my Deinanthe caerulea has a yellow, twisty stigma.

A. speciosum is really nice (and a new addition to my garden since this year).

The stigma's of my Deinanthe caerulea and of my Deinanthe bifida are white....

Wim BoensWingene Belgium zone 8a
Lori S.
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Joined: 2009-10-27

I love the pin-striped Arisaema, Wim!  It's nice to see the beautifully-grown Deinanthe in both Rick's and Wim's gardens.  (Mine has succumbed to drought and general mistreatment... sigh.)

I suppose this is a woodlander of sorts... I believe it's Symphytum grandiflorum (maybe a cultivar, but if so, I've lost its name), and it's looking very attractive with it's white, blue and red inflorescences.  Despite it's common name, creeping comfrey, it has remained in the same spot over a few years now; should I be on the watch for world-domination?    

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
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Joined: 2009-09-21

Deinanthe caerulea is another one of my acquisitions that was woefully mistreated in its early years due to my ignorance of its needs.  For three or four years it was an "ephemeral", emerging in the spring and in just 3-4 weeks going dormant.  I guess it was wondrous that it even survived that hot, summer baked, rich clay.  When I moved it to a proper site, it really jumped into growth.  It produces zillions of viable seeds, although I have not seen any volunteers yet.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I still grow comfrey also.  I hold over from when I used to dry the leaves to brew a most delicious tea.  It is still my favorite, tasting much like orange and black peko.  But there are some reports of it being carcinogenic, So I hardly drink it anymore.  I received the plant from my neighbor, who drinks it religiously, as did his father in Italy.  so I don't know what its real taxonomic designation is, but I guessed it as Symphytum x uplandicum.  Yours is much more garden worthy, Lori.  I'm not sure if it ever produces viable seed.  One year I tried in earnest to collect seed for someone; I think I got two seeds that looked good, but I never found out if they actually grew or not.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

I haven't grown comfrey, but I have got the impression that once you plant it, its for life... supposed to produce wonderful compost (really deep roots that bring nutrients from deep soils), some sort of fertiliser tea as well..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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