Just sort of interesting...

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Hey, no need to apologize!  I tend to take things at face value, and look at them but not "see" them.  Whenever I put a little effort into actually looking closely at something, trying to ID it, it is always great fun and a good learning experience!  :D

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Sorry Lori, like Mark, I didn't mean to cause any doubt! I Rather think that this Hypericum can be tried here in a crack together with other succulents. The leaves are in fact very similar to one native at the west coast of Norway, Hypericum pulchrum, but yours have fatter more succulent leaves.No picture but a link: http://www.markblomster.com/Markblomster/Flora/F/Fagerperikum.html

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

No worries!

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15
Skulski wrote:

After a period outdoors and exposure to the elements (including a few frosts and a couple of snowfalls!), some of this year's grown-under-lights-in-the-basement alpines are now making significant changes in form, from the rather loose, long-petioled, somewhat rambling things that were planted out, to the tighter forms that are more what one envisions.Here are a few of the plants on which this change is most pronounced:1) Campanula seraglio - the size of the leaves is greatly reduced... not that it was any giant before.2) Ajuga lupulina - the old 8" stems will likely soon by abandoned, I imagine, in favour of the new, tight little rosette.3) Ditto for Tanacetum tibeticum4) Dracocephalum foetidum5) Eritrichium pauciflorum ssp. sajanense6) Campanula besenginica7) Androsace spinulifera

Just thought it was kind of interesting to see these plants adapt to the conditions.

Lori,

I looked closer at your picture of Tanacetum tibeticum. The leaves are very similar to one plant I had as Tanacetum sp. from Himalaya (Chadwell seeds). (It grew like yours before I planted it out too.)I sowed seed 3 years ago and planted out 1 ex in the spring 2009. This plant grew and managed to evolve into a dome-formed cushion 1m across with 1000 flowers! They lasted all summer  and the plant died, apparently monocarpic. Sorry, no pictures!

The last days I have noticed small seedlings here and there. Do you recognize the leaves?

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Sorry, no, I don't know what it is, and haven't found anything similar by googling.  Did it have yellow or white flowers?  Sounds spectacular!

You might try posting your photo and question here:http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?board=18.0

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15
Skulski wrote:

Sorry, no, I don't know what it is, and haven't found anything similar by googling.  Did it have yellow or white flowers?  Sounds spectacular!

You might try posting your photo and question here:http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?board=18.0

The flowers were like oxeye daisy but the leaves are similar to your Tanacetum tibeticum.

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Peter George
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-09-03

Lori,I need advice on what to do with Ajuga lupulina seed. I just received my Holubec order, and I may have additional questions as I work through them, but this one is special, as you already must know. Thanks in advance.

Peter George, Petersham, MA (north central MA, close to the NH/VT borders), zones 5b and 6 around the property.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Hi, Peter,I started seeds of Ajuga lupulina on Feb. 26/10 at 20 deg C and got germination on March 8/10.  The germination rate was low - my records aren't detailed enough to give details, but if I recall right, I only got a couple of sprouts, and I ended up with only one plant.  The seeds were collected in 2008.  So, it was encouraging to see quick germination (in 10 days) but maybe germination would have been better with conditioning/stratification. I'll have to check if I have seeds left (I didn't collect any this year from it), as it would be a good idea to have a backup plant!  Unlike some of the other plants I showed in this thread, it remained fairly large as it developed, with the flower stalks reaching about 8" tall.  I did post photos of the second-year plant in bloom elsewhere, but in case you missed it, here it is:

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03
RickR wrote:

Those are pretty drastic changes.  A helpful FYI for the novice alpine seed grower, too.

I might add that such changes occur while still in the pot, too, from inside conditions to outside climates.  These are Corydalis wilsonii grown from seed started this past winter.  The last of the original "inside grown" leaves is turning, while the rest hang dried around the pots (cups).  Leaves are quite thick, and there was a significant amount of shrinking as they dry.

The second pic was take while still growing inside the house.  I'm not sure which growth pattern I like better...

I hope they survive my Minnesota winter.

Cool Corydalis, Rick... at first glance, quite similar to the local C aurea, but the leaves are bluer close up, really nice form...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Leucanthemum vulgare is a very variable species, at least in Norway, and it grows almost everywhere.Several forms are common along roads etc. These are often taller and coarser than those found in meadows etc.At our cabin in the mountains grows a smaller, more refined form that spread by creeping rhizomes. We also have two other forms that are taller and not spreading in the same way.

To the left: The smaller form, to the right: The bigger form. It is easier to see the differences when you see both at the same time!

   

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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