Iris suaveolens

21 posts / 0 new
Last post
Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I apologize that this is absolutely off the topic of Iris sauveolens... but maybe we should start a NARGS & affiliates plant sale one?  Anyway, here are some of the trays of seedlings, as they harden-off outside, that I hope to flog at the local rock garden society sale next weekend... I only wish it would stop freezing and snowing, so that they could be left safely outdoors without having to be wheeled into the garage each night!  (There are another few trays in the basement yet, which I wish I could also chuck outside!)  This exercise has shown me (as if I needed more evidence  ::)) how disorganized I am!  I have, through time, distributed individuals of the same species through various trays... I'll have to sit down prior to the sale and go through it all to make sure I keep 2-3 (or more, depending on assumed desirability?) of each species to try myself!    

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

You can at least wheel your plants! I have to carry them up or down the steps from the basement.

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Yeah, I sympathize!  Still freezing at night where you are too, then?The garage cart was my husband's brainwave!  :)  Otherwise, I'd also be lugging them in and out (though only into the garage).  Need another cart or two though! 

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15
Skulski wrote:

Yeah, I sympathize!  Still freezing at night where you are too, then?The garage cart was my husband's brainwave!  :)  Otherwise, I'd also be lugging them in and out (though only into the garage).  Need another cart or two though!   

We have had 2-3 icy nights the last couple of weeks but the worst is the cold northerly wind by day! Although the sun shines from a clear blue sky it is not more than 8-10C. Now it is 9PM and the sun is still shining but we are inside, it is too cold to be out (without winter clothing)! We barely managed to have lunch in the garden. (Yesterday was a very fine day, almost no wind and 15C but I had to work!)

I have brought almost all seedlings to a small glasshouse in the kitchengarden. I am reluctant to bring the small plants out at night, now due to cold weather later due to slugs!

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Finally downloaded a picture of my form of suaveolens: very different from Rick's: it is one of the toughest of the miniature bearded iris. I remember seeing large pots full of overgrown rhizomes of these I believe they had just sitting outside year around at Wave Hill at the edge of New York City. They would be fun to see in full bloom.

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Iris suaveolens is blooming here too, and just started a couple of days ago.  These little guys are up to 3" tall.

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Now that rain has melted a good portion of our snow, I can't really say my gardens are waking up, but at least they are showing!

One of the interesting evergreens to meet me each spring as the snow recedes is Iris suaveolens.  (Blooms to come later, of course.)

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Cool, looks like chinese pea pods curling around into bird's nests.  My Iris suaveolens is still covered with snow.

And Panayoti, I hadn't commented on your form of I. suaveolens, but its a doozy, love the long slender tubes giving the flowers some height, and intense coloration too.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Rick, yours have amazingly sickle-like leaves, compared to mine and to the others posted here!  Worth growing for the foliage alone!

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

My "Chinese Pea Pod Salad" is blooming nicely now.            Iris suaveolens var. rubromarginata

             

To get the maximum sickle shape on the leaves, grow them in austere conditions.  Absolutely no crowding allowed even in full sun, or leaves will grow straighter, upright, and longer.  Obviously, flowers are not sacrificed when grown in harsher conditions.  Even on this pic, you can see new leaves are already less falcate, due to the adjacent massive clump of  Lycoris squamigera (Naked Lady) leaves that shade the evening sun.  When the Lycoris foliage disappears in summer, subsequent iris leaves return to the more falcate shape.  This holds true for other iris too, like Iris attica and Iris lutescens.

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Pages

Log in or register to post comments