Hardy Succulents - Aizoaceae

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Another nice one PK, there seems no end to these little succulent beauties (no spines either ;)).  I'm inspired by seeing these, and the limited results I had growing these this year from some of your plants. 

I saw your post of 10 photos on SRGC, and once again I'm blown away by the sheer proliferation of bloom on the extensive mats in hot colors; Delosperma dyeri is to "die for", love those orange hot-pink-centered silken blooms.  For those who haven't seen these photos, you must follow this link on the SRGC forum (scroll down a little bit... the 10 photos are uploaded in two messages).http://www.srgc.org.uk/forum/index.php?topic=3795.msg221290#msg221290

Now I regret not picking up more of these Delospermas when opportunities arose.  This past late August 2011, on the way back back to the office from a customer onsite consultation job, my travels took me past a popular garden center in Massachusetts called Mahonies.  I stopped by, took a look around the left-over perennials (home gardener's are a fickle crown, only buying perennials in May/June when most are in bloom), there were still much to entice.  We're in a new era of horticultural access, with all kinds of wonderful plants making their way into mainstream availability... there were many treasures sitting there unnoticed.  I picked up Vernonia lettermannii (they had 2 forms no less, of this most excellent smaller Ironweed), Kirengoshoma koreana (which I featured on this forum in the Miscellaneous Woodlanders topic; http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=593.msg11380#msg11380), and several other goodies.

I had to put the brakes on in a big way, could've easily spent a couple hundred dollars, but still on financial recovery after 1-1/2 years unemployment, a new job with significant pay cut, and the double-whammy of the year where both my daughters are in college, I had to exercise tremendous restraint.  One item passed up was Delosperma Mesa Verde® (aka D. 'Kelaidis'; the name rings a bell ;)), being grown just like any perennial or bedding chrysanthemum.  The large pots filled to the brim, were only ~$10.00 each, but I already surpassed my limit, and figured if the plant has become so mainstream, I'll get it next year.  PLANTS!, such a cursed addiction!

   

Mesa Verde® Ice Plant, Delosperma 'Kelaidis' P.P.# 13876http://www.monrovia.com/plant-catalog/plants/2643/mesa-verde-ice-plant.php

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24
Quote:

PLANTS!, such a cursed addiction!   

That's what the voles say, here.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

I wish I'd been there to pick up a few Vernonias: I saw this in Kansas this year (at the Dyck arboretum) and fell in love with it. Came home and there were huge clumps at Kendrick Lake and Mike Kintgen's garden. Grrrrrrrrr. I hate not being the first to grow a plant in Colorado!

Just remind me, Mark, next May or June and I will load you up with delos, Mark!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Voles find mesembs to be irresistible treats. Squirrels too, but voles are faster out of the gate. As I watched my collection of Delosperma dyeri clones being eaten to the ground (at night, of course), it occurred to me that maybe a vole-ridden garden wasn't the best place for them, so I moved the survivors next door, where they were spectacular last year. It's too out in the open for voles to tread safely.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Flowering for weeks, but only at night, is Stomatium mustillinum, a very hardy night-blooming succulent.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

And even more cold hardy, Delosperma basuticum;

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Very attractive plants, Mark and Rick! Now I wonder whether my plants at my summerhouse have started flowering in the cool weather.

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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