Fritillaria 2012

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I've never heard of lily beetle larvae eating anything but above ground parts.  I could be wrong, though.  I have seen slugs eat lily bulbs, even here in Minnesota where it is drier than Massachusetts.  I'll bet that that is a more probable scenario.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
Hoy wrote:

What is the worse - slugs or beetles :-\

Slugs are by far the worse of the two.  Having gardened in one of the slug capitals of the world for four years, the Puget Sound area of Washington State, where hordes of "banana slugs" as big as cigars ravage herbaceous plants nightly (daily too, when it's rainy), I'd much rather be in a drier climate where slugs are not a major concern, if at all. 

At least lily beetles are small and festively colored (although the larvae that can hatch if the eggs are left to develop are gross), and the beetles can be hand-picked and disposed up without much fuss.  The plant types they attack is relatively few, versus the much broader range of plants attacked by slugs.  And besides, I find oversized slugs and their oversized abundance of slime just plain disgusting, and squishing them borders on being a nightmarish experience.

This year the lily beetles showed up extra early, no doubt brought about by the two weeks of summer-in-winter temperatures, I found them on the emerging shoots of Frits.  Killed the ones I found, but after the return to reality and back to freezing temperatures, I haven't seen any since.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Rick, that's one fine pot of Fritillaria camschatcensis you show there.  Maybe next year you'll be able to show us some bloom, isn't the anticipation the best part!

Two views today of F. crassifolia ssp. kurdica taken today, the first showing the main plant in bud, love the gray curling foliage and low downturned flower stems.  The second is a repeat of a view showing sown-in-place 2nd year seedlings of the same Frit, taken with my wife's new Canon Powershot digital camera.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Those bulbs look really happy Mark! I've never managed to establish crassifolia in our garden but it is a wonderful species in foliage and flower (mind you nearly all frits. are when you get hooked on them I think, such extraordinary and unique flowers).

Dr. Timothy John Ingram Faversham, Kent, UK I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.  

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21
RickR wrote:

I wonder if Fritillaria spp. have the propensity to skip a season(or more) of above ground growth, like many Lilium spp.?  Even undisturbed, I have had that happen with multiple species of lilies.

Well I just answered my own question:  Last season I thought I lost my white form of Fritillaria meleagris, as it never showed above ground, even though it had flowered multiple years before.  This year it is back strong.  (Left:white form, right: purple.)  Also in the pic is, Hieracium villosum, Fibigia clypeata, a single sprig of Penstemon cobaea, and Gentiana septemfida.

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15
RickR wrote:

RickR wrote:

I wonder if Fritillaria spp. have the propensity to skip a season(or more) of above ground growth, like many Lilium spp.?  Even undisturbed, I have had that happen with multiple species of lilies.

Well I just answered my own question:  Last season I thought I lost my white form of Fritillaria meleagris, as it never showed above ground, even though it had flowered multiple years before.  This year it is back strong.  (Left:white form, right: purple.)  Also in the pic is, Hieracium villosum, Fibigia clypeata, a single sprig of Penstemon cobaea, and Gentiana septemfida.

What a relief, Rick ;)

Looks pretty dry there, do you lack rain?

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Poulsen
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-11-02

Fritillaria hybrids flowering now.

They are a result of a hybridisation program involving F. eduardii, F. imperialis and F. raddeana

Breeders website: www.keizerskroon.net

Poulsen
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-11-02

And here comes the pictures...

kalle-k.dk
kalle-k.dk's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-04-05

My Fritillaria meleagris flowering now, also my double flowred alba. I got it several years ago from a friend as found it in a garden with a old farm.

Karl Kristensen Denmark. www.kalle-k.dk

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Nice plants, Poulsen.  I would imagine the hybrids are hardier and more vigorous?And welcome to the forum!!

Karl, I have never heard of a Fritllaria meleagris with reflexed petals.Very pretty, though.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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