Ferns

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Just a reminder to whom it may concern,

Special instructions for fern spore donations to the seed exchange:

Fern spores (and other dust-like seed) should be packaged into individual envelopes by the donor. The spores are so small that they are impossible to repackage. Spore packets should be small enough to fit inside the glassines used for distribution, about 1 inch or 2 cm square; folded foil or waxed paper work well.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Browsing the late summer nursery benches at a large chain Garden Center in our area, I came across this colorful and delicate looking fern, Adiantum hispidulum.  The labels gives the common name as Rosy Australian Maidenhair Fern.  It is also written "Key Benefits - Insignficant flowers" (too funny :rolleyes: ).  I was tempted to buy one, but wasn't sure of it's hardiness, even though it is being sold among supposedly hardy perennials for our Zone 5 area, there was no hardiness rating on the label.  

Looking it up, I see that this is a widespread tropical species, rated on a couple sites as Zone 7. Nurseries sometimes pass plants off as hardy when they are clearly not suitable to be grown in the zone being sold in.  Does any one have experience with this pretty fern with rosy frond tips, in terms of its winter hardiness?

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Mark, I have never tried it. However, with a hardiness rating from 7-10 I would have tried it here without hesitation but I'm not sure how it tolerates your climate. It looks very nice and if it is on sale -  ;)

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Geo F-W
Geo F-W's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-02-13

Hi Mark,

I tried it here, in zone 8, and I can tell you that it is a little bit sensitive to the cold. It survives through a large garden protection (temperatures never fall below -12 °C here) but it will never be as beautiful as in a warmer site. It would be better in pot, protected from the cold in winter.For cons, I think that hardiness depends of the clone you buy, if it comes from an area of ​​low  or high altitude etc.. A friend of mine is interested particularly in contrast to hardiness of plants harvested at different altitudes, he is botanizing in Tasmania at the moment. (for example, he collected seeds from a Schefflera taiwaniana that grew at high altitude and its seedlings have passed -18 ° c, which is far from true of all S.taiwaniana)However, it is well resistant to a relative drought, as A.venustum.

Geoffrey F-Winterspoon.Arras, Northern France, USDA zone 8 (temps min -12°c), cool and humid summer and cool winter.http://www.flickr.com/photos/29627653@N04/sets/72157627728518944/
Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hi Geoffrey, welcome to our forum on this side of the pond  ;)

I saw your registration request and recognized it instantly, glad you made it over to NARGS, hope to see you on the Epimedium pages, the season should be getting into gear in a couple months.

That's very interesting about what you recount about your friend finding high elevation forms of Schefflera, such exercises might prove useful with many plants having both lowland and mountain distributions.  Well, I don't regret not buying Adiantum hispidulum; I don't have a greenhouse, or even much windowsill space.  I have experimented with Zone 6 ferns which didn't survive our winters, so one rated as Zone 7 or 8 would have probably been a lost cause.  I too read that this fern species is relatively drought resistant.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Geo F-W
Geo F-W's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-02-13

Thank you Mark! Very kind of you.

Well, I'm quite shy but I would try to post as I can, with my average English level! :)I would have a lot of selections of Epimediums to show if you're interested, including many hybrids of 'The Giant'.

On ferns, which I love as much as epimediums, I would say you have to experiment, why not if the rates of the plant is not too high? I tried lots of ferns renowned for their sensitivity to cold in zone 8 and I had some pleasant surprises as some Blechnum, Woodwardia, Pteris wallichiana, Hypolepis, Lophosoria etc.

Nevertheless, there are so many beautiful ferns easily acclimatables and with very pretty colors, as Dryopteris labordei, Dryopteris koidzumiana, Dryopteris decipiens, Dryopteris lepidopoda, Cheilanthes tomentosa or lanosa, Adiantum aleuticum 'japonicum' or 'Miss Sharples' etc.. , or with dark scales that produce a very decorative effect as Dryopteris wallichiana which is very close to Dryopteris affinis ssp. affinis, Dryopteris polylepis or some Polystichum.

The world of ferns is so vast.

We had an extraordinary fern's nursery in Europe, created by Martin Rickard, 'World of Ferns', in Devon (UK). They closed in 2011 following the winter of 2010 that caused too much damages. A tragedy...

Geoffrey F-Winterspoon.Arras, Northern France, USDA zone 8 (temps min -12°c), cool and humid summer and cool winter.http://www.flickr.com/photos/29627653@N04/sets/72157627728518944/
RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Nice to see you here as well, Georffrey. 

Welcome!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
Geo wrote:

I would have a lot of selections of Epimediums to show if you're interested, including many hybrids of 'The Giant'.

Yes please, would love to see your Epimediums, particularly 'The Giant' hybrids.  Feel free to post in the Epimediums 2012 topic:http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=943.0

I have to admit, I'm a fern "newbie".  I greatly admire ferns, but don't currently grow many, mostly because for many of years in my current location, my property was exposed, sunny, and hot and dry.  But finally with more shade in the yard now with maturing trees, I have decided to start introducing more ferns into the garden, I think they'll be a great complement to Epimediums.  I have taken note on the ferns species you mention, and will start looking towards a spring order of some good ferns, thanks for the suggestions.

By the way, young English is just fine :)

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Geoffrey - I would be greatly interested in your experience with ferns. We grow quite a number even in the dry south-east of England, and I am keen to start growing them again from spores. I visited Martin Rickard many years ago, after seeing his extraordinary and superb displays at the Chelsea Show, and I am sure there is quite a revival again in their interest amongst gardeners. I am especially attracted by many of the xerophytic species, though these are grown by relatively few gardeners. Several of these grow well on a simple sand bed along with dryland alpines and provide good contrast.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram Faversham, Kent, UK I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.  

Geo F-W
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-02-13

Thank you Rick! I see that the nargs and srgc forums are closely related!  ;D

McDonough wrote:

Yes please, would love to see your Epimediums, particularly 'The Giant' hybrids.  Feel free to post in the Epimediums 2012 topic:http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=943.0

Ok, the first blooms of the 'Giants' hybrids will begin here in late March, so I would take plenty of pictures.(There are pictures of many epimediums in the flickr gallery under my name, at the bottom of my post).

There is an interesting book on ferns, very accessible, "Encyclopedia of Garden Ferns" by Sue Olsen, a good book, well illustrated.

Ferns are perfect companions for epimediums, indeed, particularly those with small or medium sizes like Gymnocarpium, Phegopteris, Polypodium etc.Here I grow about an hundred of them, most are really easy to grow, some require a little more care and patience, as Pyrrosia ...

Tim, here the climate is quite wet (almost 1000mm / year) and the garden soil is clayey, which doesn't let me any choice for xerics species: container or, as you say, sand bed where they grow very well in full sun. So, the number of xerics ferns here is quite small at the moment: Cheilanthes tomentosa, Cheilanthes lanosa, Cheilanthes sinuata (Astrolepis sinuata), Pellaea rotundifolia, Pellaea falcata, Pellaea atropurpurea, Paraceterach muelleri.(many forms of Ceterach officinarum but it's not really a xeric fern)I would try others but it's not always easy to find them in France...

By cons, if I often grown ferns from spores (it's incredibly easy isn'it?), I never even tried sowing xeric fern spores...Maybe later, I'm very encumbered by my little fern-seedling's greenhouses!

1 : Dryopteris affinis 'Cristata The King'

2 : Adiantum aleuticum 'Japonicum'

3 : Adiantum 'Miss Sharples'

4 : Adiantum venustum

5,6 : Onocloa sensibilis, for wet soil.

7 : Cystopteris lanosa

8 : Gymnocarpium dryopteris, a very good groundcover

9 : Phegopteris connectilis, wich is a very very good fern and a good companion for Epimediums.

Geoffrey F-Winterspoon.Arras, Northern France, USDA zone 8 (temps min -12°c), cool and humid summer and cool winter.http://www.flickr.com/photos/29627653@N04/sets/72157627728518944/

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