Douglasias and how my mind works

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Gryboski
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-11-20

I think the seed pods look more like Liquidambar, the Sweetgum.  The capsules are hard and can be used with pine cones in wreaths; the Sycamore fruit crumbles in a relatively short time.  It's (Sweetgum) a beautiful tree for fall color and its droppings not a problem if you've got a shade garden where they fall and blend in with the mulch, but to have them raining down on an alpine bed cannot be much fun!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Oh!  Very possible, in fact probably yes, since I've never seen Sweetgum pods before.  They don't grow here.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Place
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-10-22

Lori, Bob, I thought I was the only one who a) has a backlog of over 600 varieties of seed for one measly suburban garden lot and b) after having binged on starting them, has to force myself to get them out of the starter flats before they choke to death, and c) looks desperately around for somewhere, anywhere, anyone to stick them in the ground before final freeze-up closes the gardens for another year.  Whee, I'm not alone!  

This year, I have many dozens of Primula seedlings on the go, a hundred or so species ranging from Adonis to Zauschneria in the fridge cold-stratifying, about a hundred species in starter flats busy germinating, plus ambitions to start another 200-300 spp. before they expire in their packets, many of them from the NARGS seed exchanges.  Wish me luck!  

I look forward to more pictures of your spring.  Ours is late (-2 C high today, black ice and snow for the morning commute), but at least the Puschkinia will be in bloom come the next day above zero.  And no, having them against a south-facing foundation is not cheating, it still counts as spring having sprung.  

Alison, 

Zone 5a, Ottawa, Ontario

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Welcome to the Forum, Allison!

 

I classify myself as a mad propagator, too.  Your local NARGS chapter plant sale (or any plant sale) is a useful way to unload your extra plant materials.  I've been the major contributor for more than a decade for ours.  Our spring and late summer sales are our only fund raisers.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

I was gratified to read that the late Christopher Lloyd would buy plants and then wander around Great Dixter looking for places to put them. Usually my first chosen place turns out to be the wrong one; I dug up the plant to put it in the "right" one, and then it dies. 

I have 24 flats of pots outdoors, a flat of mesembs (aloinopsis, titanopsis, etc.) indoors, a thousand cactus seedlings, several dozen iris seedlings, and an ongoing astragalus germination project as well as an ongoing sclerocactus germination project. (I've posted pictures of the sclerocactus germination on Facebook). No idea where these plants are going to go. 

I was planning to go to the cactus sale at DBG tonight, but when I type "a thousand cactus seedlings" that seems kind of overkill to me. 

Never seen black ice. Heard about it. 

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

The thing is that you don't actually "see" black ice.  ;-)    Instead, you come upon it while driving, lose control, spin out, and hit the ditch at highway speed.   (With luck, the ditch is full of snow to cushion the impact, and spin is accomplished without anything getting in the way!)  That said, it's simply clear ice, that shows the colour of the substrate below, making it hard to detect (as opposed to white ice from compressed snow or slush).

 

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

So I've heard. I try not to drive anywhere when there's weather. I read a lot, instead. 

I also hear about things like rain falling, when there's snow on the ground (??), and morning dew, and "muggy weather", and plants that need "protection" in "wet winters" or "protection from summer rain" (??), and mysterious creatures called "slugs". 

 

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

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