Allium 2013

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Mark McD
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Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori can confirm, but I beileve the Allium that Lori shows is A. oreophilum, the regular species, often available in the autumn bulb bins when the Holland bulbs arrive each year, its more of a bright pink than some of the selected cultivars with very dark richly colored blooms.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I have some of these at my summer cabin but the sheep have destroyed a lot. I don't remember the name though

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

 

I believe both Aa. narcissisflorum and insubricum have pendant flowers

 

.  But narcissiflorum seed pods are erect, while insubricum's remain pendant.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Longma
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Joined: 2012-11-19

Thanks for clarifying that Rick.  I was ( a little ) disappointed to see the pendant flowers on my plants. This is the first time they have flowered for me, in fact I don't even remember seeing any foliage for the last couple of years! I was given some seedlings seven years ago, from seed of Italian origin, as A. narcissiflorum. Since then many people have told me they won't be true to that species, but will be A. insubricum. Maybe now I'll find out when the seed pods form!! 

A. narcissiflorum
A. narcissiflorum close

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

[quote=Mark McD]

Lori can confirm, but I beileve the Allium that Lori shows is A. oreophilum, the regular species, often available in the autumn bulb bins when the Holland bulbs arrive each year, its more of a bright pink than some of the selected cultivars with very dark richly colored blooms.

[/quote]

Yes, that's right, Mark.

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
One of Alliums collected in Kazakhstan by Panayoti Kelaidis is blooming, labeled as Allium sp. Kalbinsky Hills, out of Ust Kamenogorst, Kazakhstan, accession #1. Off hand it looks like Allium lineare, but will give it a more detailed eval soon. With non-stop rain, it's been devilishly hard to get decent photos.

  

  

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Updated with some better images, the first two taken a couple days afterwards, bees and ants love the nectariferous blooms.

 

 

Then these two photos taken by my wife, as she is experimenting with her new DSLR camera.

  

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Longma
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

I was recently given this lovely compact plant as Allium plummerae. I think ( hope ) it looks good for this species. The centre of each flower is deep pink on the day that it opens, but has turned to white by the next day. The leaves grow nicely erect, and it doesn't appear to 'flop' about as some Allium sp. seem prone to doing ( at least for me!). I like this one a lot, :-). Can anyone please advise if it will enjoy similar conditions to A. geyeri ? Also, do I need to avoid winter moisture for both species?

Plenty of flowers to come
I think its my favourite Allium

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Looks like really large individual flowers for an allium.  The multi coloring of the faded flowers centers are always an added bonus. Bravo!

 

Mighty nice Betula nana(?) behind there.  I didn't know it took on such a ground covering habit.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Yes, each individual flower is 1/2 inch across. I'm hoping I can propagate it quickly as I'd very much like to have these in numerous spots in the garden.

Indeed it is Betula nana Rick, good call. We use them in many places in the garden, as they fill in with good deep green foliage where the spring bulbs have died back. They only seem to grow 6 - 8 inches high here, the long branches snaking out across the ground. 

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Ron, good to see that you're growing Allium plummerae, a very fine species.  It is among the selected alliums I featured in Spring 2011 NARGS Rock Garden Quarterly, free download at the link below. Here's part of what I wrote about this plant:Among the best American onions is one not to be typecast: Allium plummerae, a rare species with restricted distribution in the high mountains of southeastern Arizona and adjacent Sonora, Mexico, often found at 7000–8000 feet elevation. It grows in moist meadows, along stream banks, and occasionally on shaded rocky slopes, and accordingly prospers in the garden if given good soil with adequate moisture, although average garden soil suits it well. This is a hardy clump-forming plant that bulks up into fine specimens.

https://www.nargs.org/sites/default/files/free-rgq-downloads/VOL_69_NO_2.pdf

For those scared of alliums seeding around too much, with this species I have never found a single self-sown seedling in a decade and a half that I've grown it.

 

PS: I updated my post above with some better photos, on Allium sp. Kalbinsky Hills, Kazakhstan.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

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