Allium 2010

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Allium listera is one of a small handful of Chinese species with hosta-like leaves, quite remarkably so in this species.  I grow three clones, all collected by Darrell Probst in China, two of which flowered this year side-by-side.  I've grown these a number of years, and it proves to be a most unique, attractive, and hardy Allium for the semi-shady bed.  I upload 10 photos showing the progression from early leaf emergence to flowering.  Normally flowering takes place in latest July to mid August, but this year we are 2-3 weeks earlier than normal.

Early leaf emergence shows off the different clones well, my original plant is the one with ruddy reddish foliage in spring, looking rather odd with fleshy shiny leaves, but robust and more leaves than the second clone... the leaves eventually turning green but larger than the other... the second clone was green and looking altogether normal, smaller and narrower in shape.  The second clone started flowering about 2 weeks earlier than my original more robust form, but there is some cross-over in bloom time. 

This year, it has been so desperately hot and dry, that the leaves started drying off as the flowers appeared, something nor experienced before, normally the leaves are in good green hosta form as the flowers open.  The smaller form did not set any seed, it was near 99 F (37 C) when the flowers were blooming, too soon to tell if the later more robust form will set viable seed this year.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

What interesting foliage on A. listera.

Mark, here, in bloom now, is the allium that you commented on previously as likely being A. nutans.  Does it still seem to be it?  The stems are flattened, and ridged.  The leaves are also flattened, about 1cm wide, and blunt at the tips.  Thank you, in advance, for an ID.

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Mark, you never stop showing interesting onions! Allium listera is no exception. Both clones had very nice leaves but the robust form wins the gold medal. The flowers weren't bad either.

And your presumably A. nutans Lori, also is very fine. Here I like the dense flowerheads better!

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
Skulski wrote:

Mark, here, in bloom now, is the allium that you commented on previously as likely being A. nutans.  Does it still seem to be it?  The stems are flattened, and ridged.  The leaves are also flattened, about 1cm wide, and blunt at the tips.  Thank you, in advance, for an ID.

Lori, that is not only Allium nutans, but a very fine form of it, both for flowers and for the leaves.  I grow one that looks similar, which is flowering now.

I have fallen way behind posting Allium photos, but here are a few recent ones.

1    Allium nutans - robust white form, looks similar to Lori's plant

2    Allium angulosum - good white form, here it is stretching for more light, must move it to a sunnier position.

3-4  Allium plummerae - this should be a standard Allium in everyone's garden who permit alliums, a first rate "garden perennial" that clumps up well, has distinctive pale gray-green glaucous leaves held straight up, topped with flat clusters of white flowers, the ovaries changing to brown or orangish colors.  From high alpine meadows in Arizona and New Mexico, this one wants full sun, but good rich (and moist) soil, but will grow easily even in dryish loam.  Almost never reseeds.

5    Allium mixed species growing together, Allium cernuum, A. stellatum and stellatum hybrids, and Allium nutans hybrids.6    Same as #5, except a week earlier, showing some of the bud habit.

7-8  Allium stellatum hybrid seedlings (ex. Allium stellatum x senescens 'Rosey Affair') - mixed white and pink.

9-10 Allium ericetorum (chartreuse yellow) on the left, A. saxatile (medium pink form) on the right, growing in a friend's garden.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Beautiful alliums, Mark, and thanks for the ID.Here's Allium flavum var. tauricum out on the corner of the sidewalk... the standard yellow.

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
Skulski wrote:

Beautiful alliums, Mark, and thanks for the ID.Here's Allium flavum var. tauricum out on the corner of the sidewalk... the standard yellow.

Looks to be a really good form, a good bright yellow.  At one point I used to select out and discard the yellow ones, in part, that's how I ended up with so many colors other than yellow, but now I have been purposely replanting yellow forms and A. flavum, just for the spots of bright color they add without taking up much space.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Allium sikkimense has been in bloom for some time now:

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

That's a pretty blue one!

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Yes, it sure is!  The other blue one I have, A. cyaneum, didn't bloom very well this year.  (Oh, I guess I also have A. cyaneum... forgot about that one.)

A couple of our native species, from a moist swale between the higher, rocky ridges on Forgetmenot Ridge (again) on Aug. 23:1) Allium schoenoprasum var. sibiricum, chives2) Allium cernuum

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
Skulski wrote:

Allium sikkimense has been in bloom for some time now:

Wow, that's a SUPERB clump of Allium sikkimense!  Well grown.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

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