Alberta Wanderings

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cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Thanks, I do love it too :) even in summer green the leaves are beautiful, now that I have seen spring colour and flowers, its even more wonderful, and probably looks great in fall too.. I'll be looking for seed sure.. unfortunately ( for me, not the place or plants!) this site is in a National Park, so no seed collecting possible (I might take one or two berries if there were tons of them, but that's in the unlikely event I get there at the right time!) , if I am lucky I might find it in the mountains outside the park, but not so many spots to easy access alpine areas there, I have to look into Mount Baldy, as I mentioned earlier, by Nordegg, much closer, but also drier mountains, so might be a very different flora...Apart from that, I will be watching for it on seedlists! As for cultivation, I guess no way to know without trying!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Arctostaphylos rubra is a very handsome plant - and not unlike A. alpina, the only one native here. As you say, Cohan, you have to be early to catch it flowering but the berries last long and I can find berries in late Autumn (on alpina that is), presumeably rubra behave likevise ;D

Isn't it allowed to eat berries in the park? Then you can spit out some seeds ;)

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Technically, I don't know if you are allowed to eat berries or not! But I don't think anyone would be too upset if I ate one or two..lol.. still I may or may not get to that area in fall.. I will still try to find it somewhere else, its not an uncommon plant, I think, but all the other locations may also be in the parks or even farther away! lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

same site: https://picasaweb.google.com/cactuscactus/AlbertaRockyMountainsMay312011...

Another surprise from this site-- I must have been here when this was in fruit, or near it, but if I noticed it (possibly not, small and scattered) I don't remember, should dig through old trip photos and see if I shot it...So, this sweet little Anemone sp (haven't dug much yet, and leaves not fully emerged to help id, but my only guess so far is A lithophila)..surely the flora of this site is well known, maybe I should check for a book in that big tourist centre across the road!!All plants I saw at this stage were single, and all were in Arctostaphylos rubra mats (at another site up the road, to come, I saw it again, in Arctostaphylos uva-ursi--maybe these spp give it the soil chemistry it needs? didn't see them in Dryas or Salix, though the two sites I saw are hardly definitive)..

     

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I have actually sowed Anemone lithophila this year and they germinated easily. However, if this is the kind of habitat they need I am not sure I ever manage to grow them :-\

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I think your anemone looks more like A. parviflora.  I like the Arctous rubra... it must be one I've been overlooking too.

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Thanks, Lori, my impression was that parviflora should have less divided leaves? I did read both descriptions, but maybe I missed or mis-read something; this one seems like the leaves will be very divided.. I'll see if I can dig up pics of both online, and re-read the descrips.. and check whether I photographed these by chance later in the season..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Somebody correct me if I'm wrong, but I'd say your plant is A. parviflora, although, yes, A. parviflora does have the less divided leaves of the two.  What I see in your photo looks like the typical single-stem with the blunt-tipped, coarsely-divided ruff of stem leaves of A . parviflora; the relative size (small) and habit appear to fit.  (A. lithophila, in our area, have prominent bluish petal reverses - something to watch for.)There are several photos of A. parviflora posted in this section of the forum, and also one or two of A. lithophila.

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

A. rubra also grows in Newfoundland but it is quite rare here and very restricted in its range...primarily around our Viking site at L'Anse-aux-meadows. A. alpina is our common species.

The flower on the Anemone does look like our A. parviflora.  HOWEVER, our parviflora often have a blue reverse so that feature is not definitive for seperating the two Rocky Mtn species.  Will to wiat for the basal leave to mature to say for sure but I will also side with parviflora.

Todd Boland St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada Zone 5b 1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

No, I wasn't meaning to suggest the bluish petal reverses on A. lithophila was a definitive difference (I remember you mentioning blue reverses on A. parviflora in your area, Todd), but just one of the differences - the two species are overall quite different (or at least I think they are  :)).

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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