Alberta Wanderings

155 posts / 0 new
Last post
Steve Newall
Steve Newall's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-08-23
Lori wrote:

  Do let us know when to expect you so that we can lay in a supply!  :D

Will be in the Wenatchees in June . The lure of chocolate would probably be enough to get me across the border

Balclutha , New Zealand

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

I'd never heard of Moro bars, either, but Mars is a staple ;)No hand-made chocolates in my neck of the woods (I suppose someone might be doing it in Red Deer, but I haven't noticed....), but I used to visit a place that had them in Toronto- along some nice things like little Italian corn meal cookies.. one advantage of that sort of place is prices that keep you from over indulging  ;D

There are actually two areas with the name Kootenay -I've looked up the reason in the past and forgot already  :-[ but I assume its something to do with the home range of the Native tribe of the same name.. the (I think) larger and better known area is the mountain park etc, in British Columbia, west of Banff National Park.. seems a beautiful area- I've been through as a child, we had relatives on Vancouver Island and went through the mountains many times with my grandparents, but I have not been there in recent years; The area I was in is the Kootenay Plains, in Alberta, in the eastern edge of the Rockies, not that far from home, probably a much drier place, though I don't know all the ins and outs of the other Kootenays!

Trond- we have plenty of dandelions already! I was thinking maybe we need bears to eat them- though we'd need an awful lot! Bears are rarely seen in my immediate area (I've never seen one here, though its not totally unheard of) but by the time you go about 30-40km west its quite possible- by that distance you are in the foothills forest (though not the foothills) which extends all the way into the mountains...

I'll try to post the next set of photos tonight if my internet connection is better (wonder how many tries it will take to post this...lol)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

So...

Where does the Kootenay Agricultural Society come in?

Perennial Seed Germination Information:

   

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

I had no idea (nice seed info, btw!)-- so I looked it up-- I knew it couldn't be Alberta- no agriculture on the Kootenay Plains! (some Native communities probably have some livestock, but I've never seen any of it!) and surely no one growing the range of plants in that seed guide!It seems to be from Castlegar, British Columbia, a place I know we have passed through on family trips, but I don't know much about it- my impression is that its between the higher wetter western Rockies- and the lower drier Okanagan.. and quite far south, not so far from the U.S. border.. not that close to Kootenay National Park, either, but on the Kootenay River..http://www.hellobc.com/castlegar.aspx?gclid=CNaagbmBqa4CFQ8CQAod5By6RAmap:http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&cp=7&gs_id=s&xhr=t&rlz=1C2CHMA_enCA366&...

Bet you could grow some nice alpines in those mountains- probably a few zones warmer than me...

here's a link to the Kootenay region in B.C.http://www.hellobc.com/kootenay-rockies.aspx

And here is the Kootenay Plains, where I visited..http://www.whereadventurebegins.com/kootenayplains.htm

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Thanks, Cohan.  I googled it a tiny bit, too, but got rather confused with so many places with the same name in it.  That germination data is one of the sources that Tom Clothier used in his data compilation (not his Deno indexing, of course). 

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

It does seem 'The Kootenays' in B.C. covers quite a large area (I hadn't realised!) with a very long lake, a river, a park, etc- so there would be all sorts of uses of the name, and the area in Alberta is totally separate...The search led me to look at various places in south eastern B.C.- many of which we used to pass through on family trips- but most of which I knew very little about..lolThen, I was led to look at hardiness zones, which led me to this site, with some rather shocking updates to climate zones-- I find myself in zone 4A- when we'd thought of ourselves as 2/3! I shall need to be bolder ;)http://www.plantmaps.com/

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
cohan wrote:

Then, I was led to look at hardiness zones, which led me to this site, with some rather shocking updates to climate zones-- I find myself in zone 4A- when we'd thought of ourselves as 2/3! I shall need to be bolder ;)http://www.plantmaps.com/

Well, it's good that it's encouraging but it's always better to let the plants tell you what's hardy and what isn't, than someone's untested, assumed, or vague assignment of zone ratings!  (A lot more fun too!  :)  )(Arrghh, my apologies, but you know how I can't resist commenting on the unreliability of zone ratings...  :rolleyes:)

Edit:   And now having looked at the map.... wow, it's bizarre!  The area west of Calgary is in a warmer zone than Calgary??  I doubt that people trying to garden out on acreages west of here would agree with that!  :o  Oops, my mistake... the colours on the legend are hard to match up to the colours on the map, but on closer examination, I think it shows a warmer zone in Calgary than west of here, which makes sense directionally.

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15
cohan wrote:

Trond- we have plenty of dandelions already! I was thinking maybe we need bears to eat them- though we'd need an awful lot! Bears are rarely seen in my immediate area (I've never seen one here, though its not totally unheard of) but by the time you go about 30-40km west its quite possible- by that distance you are in the foothills forest (though not the foothills) which extends all the way into the mountains...

I'll try to post the next set of photos tonight if my internet connection is better (wonder how many tries it will take to post this...lol)

Cohan, I assumed you wanted more bears and less dandelions ;)

When I am at my cabin with a bad connection I use to upload one pic at the time and using the modify button to add more.

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Probably less pics at one time is a good idea, but sometimes my connection is not simply slow, its very unstable- in the time I prepare a post it might disconnect/reconnect several times, and trying to post, esp photos is an exercise in frustration.. other times its fast and good, especially late at night, when not so many people in the area are using their smartphones! Anyway, the tangential searching mentioned earlier has me wandering through real estate listings in southeast B.C... no I'm not moving, but its fun to look! So no pics tonight...lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Lori, I am with you on those zone ratings, I was really joking above- I'll try plants that I think might have some chance based on what I can find out about where they come from, compared to conditions here.. what number is on my map wont change much-- especially, I find, around here--- there is just not a lot of experience growing a lot of the things I am interested in, so the ratings for plants are just not that useful- especially those that are not based on anything ;) If the zone ratings (for plants) are based on temperatures in their habitat, it at least gives you some idea to start from, though its only one factor...

These 'new' zones for Alberta are kind of dubious... we certainly still expect some zone 2 lows, even if not more than a couple of days, and maybe not every winter-- so zone 4 really seems like a stretch.. they also put Rocky Mountain House, Sylvan Lake and Calgary all in the same zone- those two towns are not quite the same as each other (there are reasons one is at the edge of foothills biome and the other is at the edge of aspen parkland!) much less either being the same as Calgary- where your winter minimums may be close to ours, but you are on average a few degrees warmer in winter! And I think Red Deer was 3b- colder than Rocky Mountain House 60km west? seems unlikely (even with a bit of additional 'chinook' advantage in Rocky, there are also more likely to be out of season frosts)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Pages

Log in or register to post comments