Agave palmeri

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DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20
Weiser wrote:

water is always at a premium no matter what form it takes.  8)

I agree, as much as I dont like it we need all we can get.

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24
Quote:

What's this talk of snow? 

 

Though a lot of residents will deny it, Denver has nine months of snow. It snows at the slightest provocation, and this is possibly the only place on the planet where the forecast has been 85F (29.4C) with snow at night. It snows here more than it does in Minneapolis. I counted over one hundred separate snowfalls between Sept. 1st and June 1st one year. Every time you turn around, it's snowing.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Calgary's weather patterns are similar... it's nice to live close to the mountains but, boy, they do mess up the weather!  We sometimes get snow in June, and snow in September is common... but on the other hand, I would find it far too depressing to claim we have ten months of snow.  ;D ;D

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

As long as I see hellebores and snowdrops blooming in January, I guess I don't care.

How's that collection for my villa on the Italian Rivera coming?

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Just looked at my Agave palmeri after our cold snap. It's NDY. (Not Dead Yet.)

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15
DesertZone wrote:

Bob, makes total sense.

Yes, perfectly.

DesertZone wrote:

Weiser wrote:

water is always at a premium no matter what form it takes.  8)

I agree, as much as I dont like it we need all we can get.

Not me. I would prefere much less of the stuff especially in fall and winter. My friends would say much less in summer too ;)

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Now it's dead. Or doomed. Odd that this is a "high elevation form" (Chiricahuas) and yet A. parryi var. huachucensis (Huachucas) is perfectly hardy here. According to Nobel (Environmental Biology of Agaves and Cacti) the laboratory results of cold hardiness tests of these two taxa are roughly the same.I'll try palmeri again next year.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Here's a pic of one from high in the chiricahua nat'l mon., looks very different than the ones in the valley.  Maybe its something different?

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

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