Advice On Growing Calochortus sp.

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Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

What a wonderful keepsake, Bob.  Many, including my wife, would have disposed of it years ago.I, on the other hand, would have treasured it for what it is ... a slice of botanical history.

At our group meetings of the East Lancashire AGS we always ask our lecturers to sign the admissions book and we now have a remarkable collection of 250 signatures from the great, the very much still alive and the very sadly long departed.

Duncan Lowe, George Smith, Frank Tindall and Wilf Kirby spring to mind from the late lamented department.

Imagine if the group had been formed earlier ... Roy, Jack and Joe Elliott, Will Ingwersen, Linc Foster, Reginald Farrer ... the possibilities are endless.  :D

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus On the moors in Lancashire, U.K. Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

I save little things like notes from Jim Archibald on seed packets, and I think I still have one of Vaclav Plestil's seed packets made out of cigarette rolling paper.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
Booker wrote:

What a wonderful keepsake, Bob.  Many, including my wife, would have disposed of it years ago.I, on the other hand, would have treasured it for what it is ... a slice of botanical history.

I had some wonderful keepsakes... such as many letters between myself and Timmy Foster, with some input from Linc (but mostly Timmy), when I was working on some NARGS (ARGS at the time) bulletin articles (mid 1980s).  There was candid commentary relative to the naming of the double green-flowered Anemonella thalictroides; whether it should be Green Dragon or Jade Feather... I had the proof that Jade Feather was the decided upon name... but I no longer have it... subsequently 3 decades later 4 different interchangeable names now get used for the one plant!  I believe my letters fell victim to a couple home moves (cross-country), and being in a home where the basement flooded and lots of boxes filled with my papers and books were badly water-damaged.  Bob, your keepsake is wonderful, and now posted to NARGS Forum at large size that's easy to read, it's available to everyone; thanks for posting.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15
Nold wrote:

I think this might be legible. (It does refer just to the winter-dormant hardy species.)

Bob

No way I can make such species grow here, at least not in the garden :-\

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

The majority of winter-hardy calochortus get rain in the spring, occasional rain in summer, and none at all in the winter. Not exactly the easiest conditions to duplicate.Winters in my garden are generally bone-dry, either with snow cover (which I detest) or without, which, fortunately for my mood, is the more common event. I remember when we went to Oregon one year, we were told to bring our raincoats. No one had ever said that to me before. A raincoat? What on earth for? I don't even own one. (I have an umbrella, but it won't open.)

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

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