Acantholimon

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Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15
McDonough wrote:

Warning: you might want to use goggles to view the spiny close-up shots.

It is difficult with goggles and glasses, Mark ;)But what about gloves?

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Tried them a couple of times and no go in my area...just too wet.

Todd Boland St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada Zone 5b 1800 mm precipitation per year

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21
Skulski wrote:

That was an extremely informative site to post, Mark!  It explained something that I had been puzzled over... which is that what I had taken to be tiny "flowers" on one of my plants, were just the calyces.

But the dried calyces are pretty, too.  This bouquet is 5 inches tall.

    Acantholimon hohenackeri calyces

       

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Not bad, Rick! That one I could offer my wife :D

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

So, what Acantholimon is shown in these two photos?http://photos.v-d-brink.eu/Flora-and-Fauna/North-America/America-Oregon/...http://photos.v-d-brink.eu/Flora-and-Fauna/North-America/America-Oregon/...

Not an Acantholimon, but Leptodactylon pungens at Crater Lake National Park, Oregon.  Obvious calyx differences, but Leptodactylon surely looks like an acantholimon.(fine photos by Marijn van der Brink)

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Leptodactylon certainly seems to share the prickly charm of Acantholimon!  Is it fair to conclude that they are a bit longer-stemmed and less mounding than the latter?  (I can only guess from photos (and one captive specimen  ;)), never having seen one in the wild!)  I was pleased to find, last year, that Leptodactylon pungens ssp. pulchrifolium was hardy enough to survive a couple of winters here.  I wonder what this year will bring?Leptodactylon pungens ssp. pulchrifolium - a plant bought from Beaver Creek Greenhouses:  

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I like these Phlox relatives (Leptodactylon) and have always wanted to grow them, congratulations on getting yours to persist for a few years and flower. Check out the CalPhotos on L. californicum for an eyeful.  But I digress, as these aren't even the same family as Acantholimon (Plumbaginaceae), they're in the Polemoniaceae, but it is amazing how some plants from one family can imitate plants in a completely different family.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Kelaidis
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Joined: 2010-02-03

There was a time when I grew Acantholimons superbly: that was at my previous house (where they persist) on a clay based soil. They are not crazy about my dry, sandy xeriscapes (much to my surprise). I have nowhere nearly as good of displays here. But I have a few pix from the last frew years that are worth sharing.

1) Acantholimon bracteatum var. capitatum does well in my rock garden (where it gets regular watering, incidentally). It is highly distinctive with the clustered flowers. This is one of the more compact species. I recommend this heartily to anyone in sunny, typical rock garden conditions. The type form (var. bracteatum) was much bigger and spreadier and I have lost it. I miss that one!

2) Acantholimon trojanum in my rock garden as well: it has persisted better than most of the androsaceum/ulicinum group, which I love but which are a bit fussy. This is tighter than most of these and has persisted in the watered rock garden.

3) Acantholimon herd of vegetable sheep in Dare Bohlander's garden: just took this the other day. Isn't it charming? Dare is a first rate gardener and superlative designer. These clumps are masses of bloom in the summer.

I have scads of unscanned slides of huge mounds of Acantholiomons I once grew. We still grow them like that at the Botanic Gardens, but I forget to photograph them. Love this genus!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

PK, nice seeing a photo of A. bracteatum var. capitatum again, a first class acantho!  Probably worth growing for the foliage alone, but with this species the congregation of florets into a head is unique and pleasing.

The photo of "Acantholimon herd of vegetable sheep in Dare Bohlander's garden" appears as an excellent example of a rock garden that isn't attempting to recreate a part of the Alps in miniature, but instead is a comfortable and pleasing "terrain" topped with variable sized rock mulch; there's natural serenity to the scene with those gorgeous low hummocks of foliage.  The scene inspires me (although I pretend the cacti aren't there ;)).

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

They're fun to set on fire, too, when dead.

I was actually relieved when the acantholimons here decided to call it a day. They had gotten so large they were growing into each other and looked fairly disgraceful. They make lots of acrid smoke that lasts for about half an hour.

Bob  p.s You can tell which seeds are viable by looking at the tube; thin ones aren't viable.

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

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