2010 Campanula seedlings

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Lori S.
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Joined: 2009-10-27

No, definitely not C. rapunculoides - that one I know well (not that I've ever allowed it into the yard); it's even a common escape into the semi-wild here.  One was over 3' tall, late-blooming, not too overly aggressive from spreading roots but enough that combined with really heavy self-seeding, it became a pest.  (Also the flower dissection, from the differences of the base of the ovary, said adenophora.)

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
Skulski wrote:

I was surprised to find in Graham Nicholls' Dwarf Campanulas, that he considers C. takesimana to be a synonym of C. punctata!  (Removes one tiny, niggling irritation from my existence, but surprising nonetheless...)

I've grown C. punctata and its varieties and color forms, and find that while punctata and takesimana have a similar "disposition", I could always instantly tell them apart. So, indeed, surprising to see what you say about Graham Nicholls offering the Korean C. takesimana as a synonym of punctata.  At the very least, one should be a subspecies of the other.  My impossible-to-be-eradicated C. takesimana grows a meter tall... I upload one photo (although I've taken many, my photos are still alphanumerically labelled thus hard to find at the moment)... don't be fooled by the lavish lusciousness of those hanging bells, this species is a monstrously aggressive.

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com  

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

My experience is that C. rapunculoides is more to fear than punctata/takesimana. And C. lactiflora pop up in every pot I have, in the greenhouse too, but is easier to remove.

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Here is a question for the Campanulaphiles out there... Does C. zoysii require stratification, and if so, warm or cold?

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

deesen
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Joined: 2011-01-31

In "Dwarf Campanulas" Graham Nicholls doesn't suggest seed needs stratification.

David Nicholson in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Peter George
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-03

It needs to be in the winter weather for about 3 months or more. It takes a long time to 'kill' off the germination inhibitors. I've successfully germinated it by placing it outdoors in late November, but when I've potted up seed in March, it's taken another year entirely. Of course you could try GA3.

Peter George, Petersham, MA (north central MA, close to the NH/VT borders), zones 5b and 6 around the property.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Thank you for the replies, David and Peter.  I think I have killed a couple of these but have never attempted them from seed.  (Well, fessing up... I have to admit I have Dwarf Campanulas too but was too lazy to look it up.  :-[ )  And when I read "(p)ropagation is by seed sown in spring or autumn" in Dwarf Campanulas, I am not sure what should be made of that  - if sown in spring, will it germinate in good time, or will it take months?  Being an optimistic about such things, I think I'd assume or hope for straight-forward germination, but perhaps that statement is meant to cover all the bases... ?  ???  Anyway, I do happen to have GA-3, and will give it a try, since I'm not good at tending apparently-empty pots for more than one season (if it did turn out that way).   Thanks!

P. S.  It's -35 degrees C with wind chill tonight,  :P

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Middleton
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-10-01

I'm going to offer a couple of suggestions that originated from European sites.  One says this mid European dwarf campanula should be sown in winter, in light, uncovered at 16C - 21C taking 1 - 3 months.  (You are good for sowing in winter, eh? Lori -35C! Hope those temps shoo off NE and do not arrive here in two to three days!)The other says six weeks of cold stratification, taking approximately one month to germinate in warm.

Sharon......wishing I'd ordered this one!

Sharon Zone 5 Georgian Bay, Central Ontario, Canada

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Well, more and more evidence that stratification, starting with a cold period, is indeed the ticket... and no quick results, as you noted, Peter!    Thanks, Sharon.

Lori Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3 -30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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