Alpines - June, 2012

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Alpines - June, 2012

How's about an update to get us into June?
Close-up of flowers on Rheum rhizostachyum:

Buds on Silene bolanthoides:

Rhodiola rosea:

Another Rhodiola... labelled as Rhodiola roseum purpureum when I bought it locally, but I'm not sure absolutely sure if that is correct; it has remained very small and has been going dormant after blooming, which seems odd:

Phlox hendersonii:

Aquilegia laramiensis:

This is not quite the floral extravagance that I hope for in the future, but I guess it's okay for a second-year seedling - Erigeron nanus, bless it's little heart : :)

Linum cariense:

Euphorbia capitulata, as the flowers go from yellow to orange:

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Oxytropis megalantha:

Dryas octopetala:

Androsace albana, from SRGC seedex seed in 2011:

Arenaria kansuensis, starting to flower:

Campanula turczaninovii, from seed in 2010 - according to Graham Nicholls, a tap-rooted sort; the buds are rather intriguing, almost black:
 

Rosularia turkestanica:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Lori, you never cease to amaze us with you never-ending plant menagerie. :o

Do rosularias change colors with the seasons similar to semperviviums?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Well, I don't know about never-ending (though I am busy replacing what I kill... sigh) but there's a couple of new things there... many thanks though!!  :)  I haven't really noticed that Rosularia change colour so noticeably as Sempervivum.

Eremostachys speciosa has opened, and the thickly-furred stem has suddenly elongated...

       

First flower on Pyrrocoma uniflora, planted in 2009:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori wrote:

How's about an update to get us into June?

June?? The temperature is more like March. I am dressed in the same way as in winter exept I wear jandals ;)

Lori, of all your gems I really fell for the Eremostachys!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

I also am intriged with that Eremostachys!  That gentian is freaky too.

BTW Lori, I'll be in Calgary the end of the month but will immediately head down to the Bighorn and Bearstooth Mountains.  I'll be in Calgary July 9-14 if you want to get together for lunch or dinner...my treat this time!

Trond, it is Junuary here too...a solid week of only 5-7 C!  Last June was a writeoff and this June is even worse!  If it wasn't for two weeks of above normal temps in mid-May, our trees would not have a leaf.  Now, the lilacs have been in bloom two weeks and still look as fresh as they day they opened.  We have also had strong winds...the north bed next to my house has been shredded...guess I have to revisit planting it out in Ligularias!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Just a few plants I shot today before my fingers went numb.  The seeds of Geum reptans look so neat right now.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

The flower stem on the Eremostachys speciosa is so thick an substantial.  Is it a biennial?

Todd, I never knew Geum did that swirly thing!  I've never been much of a fan of the genus...
Regular lilacs (S. vulgaris) were duds this year for us.  May temperatures most of March, and March temperatures most of April really did a number on the flowers. :(

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

I have 5 species of Geum but I must admit, Geum reptans is the creme-de-la-creme of the genus...but also the trickiest to grow, at least for me.  Others do not have such fancy developing seeds although Geum triflorum is also pretty cool (but its flowers are not nearly as nice).

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

RickR wrote:

The flower stem on the Eremostachys speciosa is so thick an substantial.  Is it a biennial?

The genus is said to consist of perennials, according to eFlora of China.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Todd - that geum is an absolute work of art! There is a lot more to plants than flowers (!), especially for the nurseryman who spends a lot of time scanning seedlists. Geums seem to vary from the very demure to the completely flamboyant - but they mostly do poorly in our dry garden. I have heard others describe reptans as very special.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

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