Kananaskis hike - short and scenic (Elbow Lake, Kananaskis P.P., Alberta)

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Kananaskis hike - short and scenic (Elbow Lake, Kananaskis P.P., Alberta)

Here are a few photos from a short and easy hike the other day in Kananaskis Prov. Park... We didn't see many plants I haven't shown before, so I won't repeat them... this will be mostly just a few that I haven't worn out too badly yet, and a bit of scenery from a beautiful day.

1) Cirsium hookerianum still isn't in bloom up here!
2, 3) A spectacular Phacelia sericea
4) Lonicera involucrata along the trail
5) Elbow Lake, a very popular destination
6) Pedicularis groenlandica on the wet lake shore
7) A few glacier lilies here and there (Erythronium grandiflorum) but long past blooming
8 ) Scree slope
9, 10) Epilobium sp. along the lake shore

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

1-3) Scenery at lunch stop
4) And, looking down instead of gazing upwards at the peaks that seem to lean in towards us, Rhodiola integrifolia
5) More views
6) Hedysarum sulphurescens
7) Slogging up the scree slope to check out the sparse plant life
8 ) Saussurea nuda, just starting to bloom
9) And ambling back towards the lake...
10) Zigadenus elegans

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Skulski wrote:

1-3) Scenery at lunch stop
4) And, looking down instead of gazing upwards at the peaks that seem to lean in towards us, Rhodiola integrifolia
5) More views
6) Hedysarum sulphurescens
7) Slogging up the scree slope to check out the sparse plant life
8 ) Saussurea nuda, just starting to bloom
9) And ambling back towards the lake...
10) Zigadenus elegans

/Lori, The hedysarum is marvelous.  How tall does it grow?  Do you find any other color forms?

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tempting scenery as usual, Lori!

Zigadenus elegans, do you find it above the treeline?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Spiegel wrote:

Lori, The hedysarum is marvelous.  How tall does it grow?  Do you find any other color forms?

Hedysarum sulphurescens is quite variable in height.  In the harsh conditions of dry, exposed ridges, it may only get to 20cm or so, but it can also be quite tall - say, 50-60 cm.  I haven't noticed any colour variations beyond pale yellow to white.  However, above treeline in this area, there is also Hedysarum boreale var. mackenziei, which is a vivid fuschia-purple; this one also extends into the lowlands (var. boreale).  We also have Hedysarum alpinum - mauve flowers - which seems oddly named as I don't see them above treeline but instead, out in more prairie-like settings.   (Of course, the foregoing all assumes I am not grossly misidentifying things!   :o)  

Hoy wrote:

Zigadenus elegans, do you find it above the treeline?

It's another that ranges from the alpine zone to the prairies.  It does occur above treeline (see "Ridge walk"; it grows very densely up on that low-ish alpine ridge area), in the lower alpine elevations in drier settings, so far as I have seen.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Thanks, Lori. I knew you had showed pics before but couldn't recall where. I once had a plant that succumbed when it was swamped by some shrubs.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Skulski wrote:

Spiegel wrote:

Lori, The hedysarum is marvelous.  How tall does it grow?  Do you find any other color forms?

Hedysarum sulphurescens is quite variable in height.  In the harsh conditions of dry, exposed ridges, it may only get to 20cm or so, but it can also be quite tall - say, 50-60 cm.  I haven't noticed any colour variations beyond pale yellow to white.  However, above treeline in this area, there is also Hedysarum boreale var. mackenziei, which is a vivid fuschia-purple; this one also extends into the lowlands (var. boreale).  We also have Hedysarum alpinum - mauve flowers - which seems oddly named as I don't see them above treeline but instead, out in more prairie-like settings.   (Of course, the foregoing all assumes I am not grossly misidentifying things!   :o)  

Hoy wrote:

Zigadenus elegans, do you find it above the treeline?

It's another that ranges from the alpine zone to the prairies.  It does occur above treeline (see "Ridge walk"; it grows very densely up on that low-ish alpine ridge area), in the lower alpine elevations in drier settings, so far as I have seen.

Lori, this is in response to your description of Hedysarum boreale, which sounds wonderful.  The picture is taken in the  Dolomites, and is Hedysarum hedysaroides.  Is the color similar?

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Spiegel wrote:

Lori, this is in response to your description of Hedysarum boreale, which sounds wonderful.  The picture is taken in the  Dolomites, and is Hedysarum hedysaroides.  Is the color similar?

Yes, quite similar - beautiful!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

This area looks more like those areas I've visited in the past...relatively civilized hiking!  Still some great plants...I have never seen that Rhodiola yet you seem to see them everywhere on your travels.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

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