Any info on degenia velebita

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paulhschneider
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-20
Any info on degenia velebita

I just received my 2010 seeds. It's always great to see if there are any "surprises" in the order. This year I rec. a packet of Degenia velebita. It's a new plant to me. Apparently from Croatia or thereabouts. Can anyone give me any info, picture or propagation tips??? Thanks in advance. paul s.

Jeremy
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-10-01

Holy c--p! Haven't you used the Rob's Plant's link in the SEEDEX section for your seeds yet?
Just kidding, I laughed so hard when I saw your message about the Sax trough I just had to write that. But seriously, you NEED to use the Rock Garden Plant Database for your seed, it'll tell you a lot about probably more than half of what you got. Here's what it says about Degenia velebitica  http://www.kadel.cz/flora/e/kvCard.asp-Id=7251.htm The + or - is for pH.  Good luck!  Jeremy

Jeremy
Uxbridge, MA US Zone 6a
Consider that you might be wrong.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

But nothing beats first hand experiences.  Unfortunately, that wouldn't be me.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Me neither, but Norm Deno reports the following (paraphrased to explain abbreviations):
-30% germination in 1 to 4 weeks in either 70 deg F in light (i.e. seeds not covered) or dark; then, upon with being transferred to 40 deg F, another 10% germination in 5 to 11 weeks; then, after being moved to 70 deg F again, another 6% germination in 4 to 6 days.  With outdoor treatment, 6% germination.
Deno standardized the time periods for each temperature at 3 months (one can often shortcut that and still get some germination, though probably not optimum).

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

I have several pics on various websites; check out: http://www.flickr.com/photos/delosperma/3980837101/in/set-72157622391606...

It is an endangered species extremely restricted in range (to the Velebit in the former Yugoslavia). It is long blooming, and very pretty--with decorative swollen seedpods in early summer. I wouldn't want to be without it! I suspect like most alpine crucifers it wants afteripening (which it certainly got if you just got it), then should come right up (although I sow them outside anyway).

Hope this helps.

Panayoti Kelaidis
Denver, Colorado USA Zone 5
Adonis, Galanthus, Hellebore season...forever.

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Hoppel
Hoppel's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

Degenia velebitica in my garden grows well in very sunny dry place (limestone) in summer and gets a lot of autumn/winter wet as is not covered. That very nice plant is not problematic, self-sows in a rockery.
I guess it should be grown with no problems in dry areas of US.

Michal Hoppel

Poznan

POLAND

michal@alpines.pl

www.alpines.pl

Weintraub
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-24

I've had it for several years, or at least until that area turned into concrete last summer. I don't know whether any of the plants I potted up survived. It had already seeded and I dumped any seed back into the pots so I may have enough to return it to the garden. If not, I will definitely seek it out! Very early and long bloomer here. It was next to the house, so it got plenty of water and protection, but even so, I don't amend my soil except for what happens naturally so it was growing in slightly gritty clay.

If the pots don't show any sign of life, I will be looking for a source in May! Yes, I love it that much.

Barbara Weintraub
Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
6700 feet elevation - high and dry
nominally zone 5b; i think it's closer to 6a

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Just found this picture: scrolled up and don't seem to see any other pictures of Degenia, so thought I would post it...

Sorry I do not have the wonderfully flannely swollen seedpods: I always forget to take a picture of those! Maybe this year..this specimen is at least six years in this spot and has sown about a bit...Just love it!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Kelaidis wrote:

Just found this picture: scrolled up and don't seem to see any other pictures of Degenia, so thought I would post it...

Sorry I do not have the wonderfully flannely swollen seedpods: I always forget to take a picture of those! Maybe this year..this specimen is at least six years in this spot and has sown about a bit...Just love it!

Barbara, I couldn't agree more, this is a great little plant, as showy in flower as it is in fruit.  I had posted a photo previously of the plant in seed in Peter George's garden, here are a couple links:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=373.0;attach=6757;i...
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=373.msg3592#msg3592

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Peter George
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-03

It's a nice, easy plant for a sunny and well drained location. It's native to the Velebit Mountain in Croatia, right on the Adriatic. The seeds germinate quickly in 70 degrees F., and I find that it generally seeds around each year. I keep it in several locations, and so far I've had most of them for 4 years, with only one plant dying after it flowered in the 2nd year. It blooms here in late May and stays in flower for about 5 weeks, followed by the rather attractive seed pods.

Peter George, Petersham, MA (north central MA, close to the NH/VT borders), zones 5b and 6 around the property.

Paul T
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

To my uneducated eye this looks like a wallflower (i.e Erysimum etc)?  Not a genus I've heard of before either.

Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9°C. Max summer temp 40°C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

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