Yucca nana

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DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Weiser wrote:

Here are a few photos of Yucca harrimaniae var. gilbertiana in bloom last summer.

Very nice!  It never gets old to see pics from your garden. 8)

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I think I have to try more Yuccas! I do not know where to plant them though - but I've got an idea ;)
John and DesertZone (Aaron?) you both have inspired me with your pictures ;D
Martin, those I got from you do well so far but I have them potted up and in a coldhouse till I am ready to try them outside ;)

Regarding the question of species:

Specimens are real entities, populations are real but species are artificial constrictions. You can never define a species to cover all kind of cases you'll find in nature. And definitions that hold in the wild will often fall apart when organisms are brought together in for example a garden. However, the concept of species is like all other taxa, a necessity to tally organisms and it also tells us about kinship.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Hoy wrote:

John and DesertZone (Aaron?) you both have inspired me with your pictures ;D

Lots of cold hardy yuccas, but they like warm summers.

PS, you can call me DesertZone, Aaron or DZ....it don't matter to me, just as long as you get a response. :D 

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

Martin Tversted
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-03-24

In countries with cool summer hybrids are the best. Y nana though are by far the most cool loving species I know of. Often starting to grow late March here. About hybrids a person like Benny Møller Jensen is working intensely with the production of new hybrids combining the coldwet tolerance of the filamentosa complex with stem and leaf differences from desert species.
Even hybrids betwin filamentosa and aborescent forms like elata seems to grow rather fast in our cool summers.
I have made the combination  flaccida x nana myself and hope for something interesting. Another combination I made of (neomexicana x glauca ) x flaccida is showing a lot of vigor and maybe they will also grow well in Norway.

Martin

Martin Tversted
Central Jutland, Denmark Z6

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Quote:

I have made the combination  flaccida x nana myself and hope for something interesting. 

What about species like Y. pallida or rupicola? Both are hardy here, and though they will grow dry, they do come from wet climates (eastern and central Texas) and will take quite a bit of water.
I would think that hesperaloes (at least parviflora) would do well, too.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Martin, please tell me when you have anything to trade ;)

Bob, although eastern Texas is wet it also is warmer in summer than any place in Norway (or Denmark)! Summer heat is an important factor too.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Bob - you are right that Hesperaloe parviflora does OK, at least in our climate. I have grown it for quite a few years and it flowers every two or three years - really colourful. They are certainly well worth trying because they are easily raised from seed and if given a spot with reflected heat, say from a wall, they might flower more consistently. (Does Hesperaloe flower annually in the wild?).

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Quote:

(Does Hesperaloe flower annually in the wild?). 

I don't know. It's not a desert plant by any means. Say 100cm rain a year in the wild. Why it's completely hardy in Denver, I don't know. I imagine that the reason for its drought tolerance has something to do with evolution in the past; it doesn't flower here unless it gets quite a bit of rain (or irrigation) in spring.
A couple of other species, like H. campanulata, have overwintered here (I killed it by moving it around the garden too much) and H. funifera. There's a large plant of the latter at DBG, in a more or less protected location, but here, it turned to mush at 1 degree C warmer than it is right now. (-17C) Uh oh. There's another plant of funifera in the garden, covered with snow. Maybe it will be okay ....

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

No plant in my garden will experience that (I hope)! The coldest in my time here (>25 years) is a few days of -16C, even last year which was extremely cold. Today we had +3C and sleet. Now it is +1 and you can fill what covers the ground in a glass and call it slush ;) With some colour added it looks great :o

However, my personal low record is -35C in Northern Norway.

100cm precipitation is more than they get in Oslo and more than I get at my summerhouse I think but much less than I get here.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Weiser wrote:

Martin very nice plant and photo. Yuccas in bloom are very dramatic and defiantly steal the show!
But they don't stop there. They give some of the best year round drama to the dry garden when the early morning or late afternoon sunlight reflects off the leaf fillaments. They seem to be on fire.

Here is my Yucca nana.

Love it!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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