What do you see on your garden walks?

1060 posts / 0 new
Last post
Anonymous
Title: Guest

"I suppose it was mating or play or territorial behavior, as a pair of tiny bunnies (relative to the jackrabbits I'm used to, anyway) would rear up and box each other for a bit..."

I have seen such displays in Illinois.  It is a rare year that we get such a treat.  The rabbit population fluctuates wildly.  When the population of rabbits is high they often behave in this manner.  They will be sitting in a group.  One rabbit will will charge another rabbit.  The rabbit on the receiving end will often jump into the air so the charging rabbit ends up running underneath it.  It is fun to watch these bunny games.

The cottontail rabbits in my area are an edge species.  This is the reason they love backyards so much.  In large open grasslands cottontail rabbits are almost never seen.  If you do see a rabbit it is almost invariably near a brush pile or some other form of cover.  In wild areas they tend to stay near the woodland edge where thickets give them cover and a winter food source.

It is interesting to me that certain species are so selective about habitat type.  For example, grassland birds will not use an area unless it is 100's and sometimes 1000's of treeless acres.  The structure of vegetation is very important for certain species.  It is a rare prairie that is over 20 acres.  You can see how this posses a big problem for grassland birds.  Luckily, structure is more important to birds than quality vegetation.  They have been able to hang on in hayfields and rotationally grazed pastures.  Given the rarity of areas large enough to support grassland birds, much effort go toward creating the large treeless areas they require.

Sincerely,

James   

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Rick - both pines were grown from seed. The first one is the Mexican Pinus patula (a poor specimen that I had left over from the nursery with a very twisted stem, but it has made a nice plant). The lower one is P. ponderosa which is growing at quite an alarming rate! I don't grow wallichiana but it is a beautiful specimen in a friend's garden - one of the best pines I think.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Yes, had I thought of it, patula would have been my first guess.  Also had wondered if the second one might be P. pondersosa.  Mine grows 1.5-2ft (46-60cm) per year.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Kelaidis wrote:

Just found a picture of Arabis androsacea, Tim!

Well, Panayoti and Lori, I'll be looking out for that one on the Seedex list when it arrives!
This spuria iris arrived as a volunteer seedling in a bed of summer dormant bulbs - how it got there I don't know, though it does grow in our neighbour's frontyard, about 200 yds away! It appears to be Iris orientalis

This white siberian iris has done well,

While a mauve-blue one is less floriferous this year, though the Sprekelia formosissima next to it has been brilliant!

In the "bog garden" a couple of Louisiana iris have opened,
possibly "John's Lucifer'

possibly "Koorawatha"

cheers
fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

October 30th in the garden.

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Thanks to some of the leaves still on the trees, the damage was extensive.  Magnolia soulangeana, not a relaible bloomer every yeare due to frequent late frosts, but very beautiful when it did bloom.

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Anne - really sad to see such damage to the magnolia. It is the most extraordinary tree in flower. I remember a large tree in Canterbury near us which was savagely pruned one year with no thought for its shape. Now though after some years it has grown out and made quite a shapely specimen again. (Not that such pruning is to be recommended!!). I hope we are not in for another severe (relatively) winter here, as I am still clearing up after the last one.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

One of the 'Death Camas' .....Zigadenus fremontii currently is at it's peak.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Anonymous
Title: Guest

These will probably be my last views of 'Fall' in my garden. 

I love the color in my Fothergilla major 'blue shadow.'

The Spireas have nice color from Spring to Fall.  The ones that were abused at the home improvement store have the deepest color.  This is the opposite of what I would expect.

The 'Front Path Garden' has Coreopsis auriculata, Geranium sanguineum, and Armeria maritima.  The Geranium sanguineum is particularly beautiful because some of the leaves are red while others are green.  This gives the plant a Christmas look.

I included the Alberta Spruce surrounded by Snapdragons because I like the echo of shape between the pavers and the Spruce.  I cannot take credit for this design.  It was here when I purchased my home.  I only planted the Snapdragons.

The Red Maples are one of my favorite trees for Fall color.

The last picture is of Pineapple Sage.  I planted this for my hummingbirds.  It did not begin blooming until after all the hummingbirds had migrated South.  Since it did not accomplish its purpose, I will not be planting Pineapple Sage in the future.

James

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

A sad sight of damaged trees and shrubs :(

The Magnolia soulangiana I grow at our summerhouse lost the top of its main stem and some limbs due to heavy late snow a couple of years ago but now it is completely regrown. I removed the broken limbs and doctored the wounds with a sharp knife but did nothing else.

Now snow or frost here, in fact it is extraordinary mild for the season. The last days have reached 15C in daytime and not less than 11C at night. However, two nights with 0-2C a couple of weeks ago transformed the colours of the leaves and heavy rain later defoliated almost all the deciduous trees and shrubs so not much fall colour to show. In stead some plants still flower and Viburnum farrerii is in full bloom with fragrant flowers.

   

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Pages

Log in or register to post comments