What do you see on your garden walks?

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

McDonough wrote:

 He suggests soaking the seed in water for several days to a week...then store in zip-lock baggies with sphagnum and just a hint of moisture, put them in your vegetable drawer in the fridge for the winter.

--- This IS cold stratification.  ;D
Most of the time, the method is to place dry seed in a moist medium for a cold period, during which time the seed absorbs moisture and does its chemical transformations.  Since the magnolia seeds have already imbibed all the water they will take, they need only be kept from dehydrating while in the fridge.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

McDonough wrote:

 He suggests soaking the seed in water for several days to a week...then store in zip-lock baggies with sphagnum and just a hint of moisture, put them in your vegetable drawer in the fridge for the winter.

--- This IS cold stratification.  ;D
Most of the time, the method is to place dry seed in a moist medium for a cold period, during which time the seed absorbs moisture and does its chemical transformations.  Since the magnolia seeds have already imbibed all the water they will take, they need only be kept from dehydrating while in the fridge.

Thanks Rick, I had assumed stratification referred to actually freezing the seed in some medium to simulate winter conditions, but that's not necessarily the case, I'm embarrassed to admit :-[. 

In the following link, Southern Magnolia (M. grandiflora) is mentioned, with the suggestion to remove the pulp, with moist pre-chilling period of 2-4 months.
http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil/hil-8704.html
The seed germinates like beans in a week or two in the spring.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

indeed.  I have only had one experience growing any magnolia seed.  Hardly anything to make an assumption about.  Just sayin'.

For the benefit of all:
Actual freezing is not part of cold stratification.  The whole point of cold seed stratification is to allow chemical processes that only occur (or occur efficiently) at cold temperatures, to go forward.  Within the seed, these processes remove their associated chemical inhibitions to germination so the seed can subsequently sprout.  Even Dr. Deno could never say what that exact best temperature is, only that it is about 40F (4C).  When a seed is frozen, the chemical processes that are triggered at these temperatures stop.

  It is interesting to note that often distributions of a species in very cold areas need less stratification time than the same species from a warmer region.  This is because a much greater percentage of the species northern distribution's winter is in a frozen state, when the stratification processes are halted.  Therefore, even though the winter is longer, the usable stratification temperatures occur only in the fall-to-winter and winter-to-spring intervals - resulting in a much shorter cumulative time frame. 

Contrast this with the warmer climate, where the ground may hardly freeze at all: cold temperatures hover above freezing for a much longer time period, through most of the winter.  The species phenotype native here, would adapt to requiring a longer cold stratification interval to match its climate.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

RickR wrote:

--- This IS cold stratification.  ;D
Most of the time, the method is to place dry seed in a moist medium for a cold period, during which time the seed absorbs moisture and does its chemical transformations.  Since the magnolia seeds have already imbibed all the water they will take, they need only be kept from dehydrating while in the fridge.

And to add to this, "stratification" (or "conditioning", which is the term Dr. Deno seems to prefer in his publications, in the sense of getting the seeds into the condition where germination can occur due to the breakdown of chemical inhibitors) may also begin with a warm period, followed by a cold period for some species, and sometimes repetition of the cycle is needed.  Dr. Deno's publications are fascinating reading!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

A few alpines producing flowers rather early! Our autumn has been exceptionally long and mild, only just now beginning to get light frosts. Rather nice to see a gentian in December!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tim, are you sure it is early and not late blooming? I had liked to see a gentian here too at this time of the year!

Although we haven't had much frosts either not much are blooming. Instead everything is dripping wet and the soil is completely saturated.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

It's summer now and the asiatic lilies are in bloom.
Lilium "Giraffe"

Lilium "Tresor"

The Lilium longiflorum hybrid "Deliana"

cheers
fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Summer :o it is still one week till the sun "turns". It is dark when I leave home in the morning and dark when I come home in the evening!
Still, nice to see your lilies, Fermi, reminds me that winter has an end.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Hoy wrote:

Summer :o it is still one week till the sun "turns".

Trond,
In Australia summer is decreed to start on December 1st!
:rolleyes:
cheers
fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Some nice plants there Tim amd Fermi.

Raised from seed sown November 08-- Dicentra peregrina with 4 flowers so far .

At one stage a few seasons back i had about 25 small seedling plants coming along --yes i was going to rule the world i thought  ;D,(well at least my little patch down here in New Zealand....  :rolleyes: ;) ), but as befalls the 'plans of mice and men' they all, including a couple of good sized parent plants i had coaxed on for a number of years, perished over a winter..... :'( :'(

I'll be more careful this time .

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

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