What do you see on your garden walks?

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Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

If it likes you Arum italicum can spread alarmingly by seed and can be prone to appear in the middle of more choice plants! It delves very deep. On the other hand it makes very nice company with other woodland perennials and I wouldn't be without it!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Tim wrote:

If it likes you Arum italicum can spread alarmingly by seed and can be prone to appear in the middle of more choice plants! It delves very deep. On the other hand it makes very nice company with other woodland perennials and I wouldn't be without it!

Thanks for the advice Tim.  It might be something similar to warnings about Pinellia pedatisecta, or the genus Pinellia in general, however I've had P. pedatisecta for many years, it has barely spread at all.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

We're heading out of spring into another hot summer but maybe not as dry as our drought years. There are still plenty of flowers to see when we walk in our garden.
Firstly, here's a bulb from North America, good ol' Triteleia laxa

Another Triteleia, this time T. ixioides with the magnificent Habranthus robustus "Russell Manning"

A "volunteer" in the bulb bed - some sort of Salvia and quite attractive.

A marvelous ground-hugging banksia, B. petiolaris,

cheers
fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Fermi, the last one, the Banksia, is a gem! I have always wanted to try some Banksias and other Proteaceaes but never succeeded.
How hardy is B petiolaris?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

harold peachey
harold peachey's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-22

[i]A. italicum appears perfectly hardy here in Centra lNew York and has not spread aggressively in the three years it's been in the ground.  We are in the snow belt and usually have good snow cover in winter.  They are looking quite beautiful right now.

Harold Peachey
USDA Z5, Onondaga, NY US

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Hoy wrote:

How hardy is B petiolaris?

Yes I want to know also.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Hardly any banksias could be said to be really hardy - the only species grown in the UK (except in the very mild south-west) is the Tasmanian B. marginata. A few others are probably nearly as hardy (maybe to -10°C or a little below) but so few gardeners grow them. But the more tender species do very well in large pots kept overwinter in a cool greenhouse, and the foliage of many of them is spectacular, let alone the flowers! In 'Banksias' by Kevin Collins, Kathy Collins & Alex George B. petiolaris is described as 'quite frost hardy', which probably means short intervals to around -5°C. Some of the dryandras are very good too, and smaller and more manageable in a greenhouse.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Quote:

  Hardly any banksias could be said to be really hardy 

True. Life isn't fair. If someone wants to take up a collection....for me....to buy a decaying villa on the Italian Riviera, I'll be happy to grow as many banksias (and hakeas and proteas) as I can, and report back.

One of Cindy's most prized books was a signed copy of Celia Rosser's banksia book. Stunning watercolors of some totally cool plants.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Hoy wrote:

Fermi, the last one, the Banksia, is a gem! I have always wanted to try some Banksias and other Proteaceaes but never succeeded.
How hardy is B petiolaris?

Hi Trond,
Tim has given the best advice (apart from Bob's suggestion of moving!) for growing these in your climate. We experience occasional to frequent frosts of -7oC but mostly around -3oC, so it would hardly be the same for you.
Where we are on the east side of Australia we have problems with the flamboyant species from Western Australia but we're trying whatever ones come our way in raised beds and sand-beds with some success (and some losses!).
cheers
fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Thank you Bob and Fermi.
Probably it is safer to grow Banksias and relatives in pots, however, if the temperature continue to rise like this fall I end up growing tropical plants in my garden ;D
The coldest night and the only one below 0C so far this autumn is -0.7C! The last two winters were exceptionally cold, usually we experience -7 - -8C some days in row but not for long. The mean temperature for the coldest month is February with +0.5C. However the main problem is lack of high summer temperatures. . . .and of course getting seed/plants!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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