What do you see on your garden walks 2014?

125 posts / 0 new
Last post
RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

One of the winners from the enormous amount of extra rainfall I've had this season: Gentiana tibetica and Gentiana septemfida

          

Oops!  Almost missed seed collecting - Iris reichenbachii and Draba rigida var. bryoides

Anthericum racemosum and Ruellia humilis

                     

Deinanthe 'Blue Wonder' and Deinanthe caerulea

           

Accidentally pulled up some Thalictrum thalictroides tubers.  Aconitum lamarkii

           

Hakonechloa macra 'Albo Striata' and Jovibaarba heuffelii

            

Manfreda virginica.  Flowers are quite out of the ordinary.  The stamen filaments always seem to have these uniform bends initially, that straighten as they age.

           

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Trond, the Impatiens species seed you sent me in early 2013 didn't come up until this year. Well worth the wait.

                    

One of our native asters, Symphiotrichum sericeum, and Rudbeckia subtomentosa 'Henry Eilers'. Colchicum x agrippinum

                         

Hystrix patula, Aconitum lamarkiiThalictrum coreanum produced seed this year for the first time in nine years.  It is a dioecious species and I only have one clone, but this year it must have produce some perfect flowers, according to Aaron Floden (his best guess).  It interesting that the same thing happened in his garden this year, too.

           

 

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Looking fantastic there, Rick!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Seems you have some nice flowering going on Rick!

Glad at least some of the seeds I have sent you germinated!

How tall are the Impatiens plants?

 

I also have some white/pink ones.

 

 

 

 

 

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Hoy wrote:

How tall are the Impatiens plants?

They had emerged in the 4 inch pot quite late for impatiens, at the end of May. (I. namchabarwensis is late, too.)  And I am embarrassed to say that I didn't get them planted in the ground until mid July, when they were only 5-6 inches, languishing, due to the pot size constraints.  They are almost 3 feet now, and from the looks of it, they would have grown to 6 feet, had I cared for them correctly!

 

How tall do they grow for you, and how is that in relation to I. glandulifera?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Jeddeloh
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-05-02

So, Rick and Trond,

What species are those impatiens?  I have namcharbarwensis but it's an annual for me.  I just let it seed into pots, put them in my greenhouse and the seed germinates at about 40 degrees (4. 5 C).  It then sits there at the cotyledon stage for months until it warms up.  

 

Jan Jeddeloh, Portland, Oregon, USA, Zone 8.  Rainy winters (40 inches or 1 meter) and pleasant dry summers which don't start until July most years!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Jan, I think I have the common annual "weed"  Impatiens glandulifera which is the one which grows biggest (3m/9ft in good moist soil). It is several colour forms of that one.

I also have another annual which is much shorter and with a different kind of inflorescence and which branches more freely. It is only one but a deeper colour though. The seed pods are also a bit different, slimmer and longer. I don't know whether the last one is another species or just a form of glandulifera. I am not sure but I think they hybridize.

Both seed freely in the garden and pop up everywhere. Fortunately they are easy to pull when young.

 

I also have a perennial, Impatiens arguta which is well behaved. It is about 1ft tall and starts flowering in summer.

Another perennial, Impatiens omeiana, which is very pretty but very late in flower.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

All impatiens are annual for me.  I don't know the species of the lavender one I just showed.  Trond sent me seeds labeled as Impatiens sp. when I asked for them.  They are certainly not closely related to glandulifera, which have whorled leaves and fat pods.  The lavender sp. has alternate leaves and and long,  narrow pods, like I. balfourii, which I also grow.  I only had namchabarwensis for a few years.  While the others reseed massively, namchabarwensis was quite sparse, and I just didn't keep it going.  Loved it when I had it, though.  I did have a problem now and then, with a "sudden death" symptom, like a wilt.  I've never seen it on any other impatiens, except namchabarwensis.  It does seem to need the warmth more than balfourii and glandulifera.  In the nine years I have had these two species growing amongst one another, they have never produced any hybrids.  I use to have the pink form of glandulifera (from a different source), but I kept weeding it out in favor of the white that I like far better.  Glandulifera grows 5-7ft in my not so moist garden.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

This time of year is when the South African bulbs are stunning.

Here are mixed ixias

mixias

Babiana stricta

Babiana stricta - rosy-purpleBabiana stricta - mauve-purple

cheers

fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Stunning, indeed, Fermi.

Only the final dribs and drabs of bloom left here, as is normal for middling October.

Here's a little fall colour... mostly on the ground, though!

'Schubert' chokecherry leaves; birch, pear and apple leaves, against Ajuga reptans 'Mahogany'; wayfaring tree, Viburnum lantana:

      

Rosa spinossima (red) and Rosa rugosa cv.'s; dried flowers on Carlina acaulis

    

Seedling of Artemisia filifolius - hoping it winters over; a little fall colour on Draba ventosa and unknown Draba sp.:

      

Winter resting rosettes of Androsace spinulifera; Arabis androsacea with a couple of flowers; Androsace chamaejasme:

    

Rhododendron mucronulatum 'Crater's Edge':

Guess it's a foregone conclusion that winter is around the corner when the jackrabbits start to turn white... starting with the backs of the ears on this fellow:

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Pages

Log in or register to post comments