What do you see on your garden walks? 2013

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IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Tim wrote:

There were some intriguing matthiolas in the Czech gardens, including this one in Vojtech Holubec's, with soft brown flowers (I'm not sure if this is M. alchemilloides?).

Vojtech got that Matthiola from Josef Jurasek, it was his collection, he calls it Matthiola montana.

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Beautiful Liliums, Gene, and the Linnaea, too.
I've never looked for seed in the wild up here.  That will change..... :)
----------------------------------
Now, after the Chapter plant sale, and a major family gathering, I can begin to catch up....
Some sale donations with new happy owners:

Aquilegia ecalcarata
           

This one has a high cute factor: Myosotis decumbens
         

There's no need to explain why this one is named Sempervivum octopodes
         

Some Lewisia cotyledon from NARGS seed
       

Valeriana montana.  In the garden, I have it growing between limestone "crazy pavement".  Quite an inhospitable place, considering it is practically subsoil clay that is mud in the spring and baked in the summer.  As the area has become part shade over the years, it is doing better now.
           

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Dodecatheon meadia alba
   

No seed last season, Stephen.  Perhaps this year.  Arrenatherum elatius ssp. bulbosum 'Variegatum'
         

I never would have thought Taraxacum seed was that yummy.  After all, the weedy species is everywhere here.  But...
checking on the progress of seed, someone found it was tasty.  I managed to save the last seed head.  Taraxacum pseudoroseum
       

Xanthoceras sorbifolia
, Aconitum lamarkii, and Epimedium davidii (I only let a few of each impatiens species mature, but that's enough to take over the world anyway. ;D)
       

Thermopsis fabacaea, Veronica rupestris 'Heavenly Blue'.
       

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Gene wrote:

IMYoung wrote:

Drat! And I was just about to send you a begging  letter for seed!  :'(
M

Will the plant police take me away if I send you some cuttings?

I don't think so, Gene - they would be most welcome. :-*

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Gene, it is obviously the same species of linnea which grows here, but is it identical? Here are two pictures taken in the wild as I have never tried it in the garden.

 

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Rick, you show a lot of gems!

From my garden today: At last the peonies are in flower, Paeonia rockii cv from seed and P mlokosewitschii.
The Ranunculus parnassifolius is still flowering on the roof.

       

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I was delighted to discover today that the couple of caterpillars I noticed on Mertensia ciliata are police car moth (Gnophaela vermiculata) larvae.  Well, I had been thinking of reducing the burgeoning population of Mertensia ciliata but now I've reconsidered!  (I also have Mertensia paniculata, which would be one of their native food sources... haven't seen them on those plants yet.  It appears they are feeding on the inflorescences.  Mertensia paniculata isn't blooming yet... wonder if that's why they're on non-native Mertensia ciliata, which has been in bloom for some time?)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/theresaburg/4842334588/

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

It warms my heart to be in the company of people who don't automatically think bugs are bad.

  That caterpillar is exception beautiful, too, Lori!

I've pretty much resisted the peony temptation, but it's really hard with those pics Trond, Lori, et al.
I do have some seedling P. ostii:

     

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

RickR wrote:

It warms my heart to be in the company of people who don't automatically think bugs are bad.

What a great observation, Rick!  My sentiments, also.
The only "bugs" I kill are those that are attacking me - mosquitoes, horseflies, stable flies (though I sometimes feel a little bad about doing so - after all, sucking mammalian blood is a pretty amazing adaptation for survival!)  However, I have to admit to an unrelenting blood-thirstiness where lily beetles are concerned, but, given that they are introduced pests, I don't feel bad about squashing them!

Well, Paeonia ostii looks like a great addition to the garden, whether or not you're ever inclined to add others.  Where did you get the seeds?

Eremostachys speciosa; rather large for the rock garden, but I like it anyway - reminds me of a wooly Pedicularis.
   

Dianthus scardicus, from seed last year - dark buds followed by sugar pink flowers:
 

Paeonia officinalis was looking fabulous the other day:

First bloom on last year's Penstemon pumilus seedling:

Townsendia parryi - now fully open:

First bloom on last year's seedling of Silene nigrescens; I had a nice plant a few years ago but lost it - it's taken quite a while to get another one going again:

I got this as Saxifraga FJK 3... ??

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Ranunculus pyrenaeus:

Eritrichium pauciflorum ssp. sajanense:
 

Silene bolanthoides - this one looking very white:

Rheum rhizostachyum and dark buds of Campanula stevenii ssp. turczaninovii; Iris mandshurica; Androsace sp.; Arenaria kansuensis; Edraianthus niveus:
       

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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