What do you see on your garden walks? 2013

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Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

What with Fermi's Lycoris and Dave's Lapageria it feels like summer might not be too far away after all (although I've never had success with either of these). Spring is at last on the move, with the star plants probably being some of the tuberous anemones that seed around on the sand beds, and I couldn't resist showing the American Synthyris stellata too, which has been in bud since mid-February waiting for warmer weather.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

I think spring has sprung.  It will be 70 today.  We seem to have gone from 40s and skipped over the 50s and 60s.  It is also very dry.  We really need some rain.  In bloom today in the garden.
Helleborus niger
Helleborus 'Pink Teacup'
The first is always the earliest of the hellebores.  The second seems to be quite as tough but blooms a couple of weeks later.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Dave, the Lapageria is beautiful! I can't grow it outside but once I had a plant from seed in my greenhouse. It lived and flowered for many years but nothing like that! Unfortunately if froze to death some years ago (and so did a pretty Callistemon I had there too) :'(

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tim, I can't grow Anemones like that although I have tried! I haven't had much luck with Synthyris either so far but I am still trying!

Anne, beautiful Hellebosus! All mine have lost their bud this winter and spring in the freeze-drying weather we have had for 3 months.Seems we will have a change tomorrow!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Nice to see the flowers, all! Nothing yet here- I was excited to see some exposed soil for a while, though it was all covered up again the other day...lol
I did have some busy days working on a long area on the forest edge behind the house that is going to get some development for food gardens (hugelkultur and other permaculture approaches) as well as some native and dryland plantings.

Anne - love the hellebores- I managed to kill the free ones I got as supermarket leftovers last year, before I could get them outside, but I just got three more yesterday the same way, so I will have to be more attentive with these ones until it's warm enough to start hardening them off outside- many weeks of frost yet here...
Tim- interestng Anemones! what do they do foliarly?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Gene Mirro
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-25

A group of mixed Erythronium species and hybrids:

[attachthumb = 1]

After you've grown Erythroniums from seed for a while, you will need a place like this for mystery plants.

Some of them have very dark mottling on the leaves:

[attachthumb = 2]

Does anyone know if this is a named hybrid?  I looked up White Beauty, and it does not have mottling this dark.

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

Cockcroft
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-27

That's a wonderful mix of erythroniums, Gene.  Here's a little patch of self-sown bulbs that found a place to their liking under an Edgeworthia chrysantha.  The leaves in the background are all Trillium sulcatum seedlings that need a new home.

The second picture is of 'White Beauty' in my garden.  You are right, the mottling is not nearly as dark as yours.  Your form is gorgeous.

Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington Zone 7-8

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Gene and Claire - wonderful plantings of erythroniums. After many years I am beginning to get them self-sowing a little and hope to get drifts like that in a few years time. I do have one plant of E. californicum, grown from seed, with really good leaves just as they start growing. Great plants.

Cohan - the anemones have palmate cut leaves but go summer dormant very quickly, so never make large plants - effectively they are 'bulbs'. A few people have managed to establish them in short turf (at Blackthorn and Ashwood nurseries for example) and they look stunning like this en masse.

Trond - I've also tried Synthyris a couple of times before and not kept it in the garden - so fingers crossed - but it's a very lovely woodlander (would have thought it would do well with Clintonia?).

The saxifrages are in a cool crevice trough in a friend's garden - I find they burn off very easily but these are sited perfectly. In another part of the garden is probably the best plant of Helichrysum coralloides I've ever seen - I wonder how it compares with plants in Nature?

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Gene Mirro
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-25

Tim, those leaves are a match for mine, no question.

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

You do know how to tease me, do you, Gene and Claire! All those beautiful erythroniums :o None of mine has emerged yet :-\  However I have some nice potfulls of seedlings thanks to a generous forumist!

Tim wrote:

Trond - I've also tried Synthyris a couple of times before and not kept it in the garden - so fingers crossed - but it's a very lovely woodlander (would have thought it would do well with Clintonia?).

Tim I do agree - but I suspect that the slugs are to blame and not the climate.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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