What do you see on your garden walks? 2013

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Gene Mirro
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-25

Hoy, we are having a very dry warm spring in the Pacific NW.  The previous three springs were very wet and cold.  So I am getting caught up on a lot of gardening chores this spring.

The Ribes sanguineum flowers before the leaves emerge.

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

Cockcroft
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-27

Gene, you are not that far away from me but your plants are at least a week ahead of mine.  Gorgeous displays!

Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington Zone 7-8

externmed
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-03-01

Hoy wrote:

externmed, nice crocuses and peony! is the peony from seed?

Hi Hoy,
Sorry I think the Peony was from a commercial source.  I have some Peony seeds doing a warm treatment now.  The only Paeonia I have germinated myself are from seeds I collected  (seeds die relatively quickly?).  Even then it's a long warm treatment followed by 3 + months at cold then growth at warm.  Paeonia cambessedesii, from warmer Southern areas including Crete, might take less stratification?

NE Massachusetts (New England) USA  zone 6 (5B to 6B)

gardens visited, photographs:  www.flickr.com/photos/wildmeadow

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

externmed wrote:

Crocus from NE Massachusetts- NE USA. The best, Crocus tommasinianus roseus was planted in hard clay sod, by chipmunks, but after they ate 97%. Paeonia cambessedesii is in a frost-free room and put outdoors in morning sun for the summer.  Forecast 63F high 23F low this week.  17.5C/ -5C  Somewhat normal unsettled spring weather.

Wow! Crocus here are well and truly gone before the peonies are in bloom! Amazing to see them together like that!
It's autumn here and it shows

Sternbergia sicula
Lycoris aurea
Nerine fothergila "Major'
Brunsvigia gregaria
Crossyne flava in seed
Lycoris elsae
cheers
fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

externmed wrote:

Hoy wrote:

externmed, nice crocuses and peony! is the peony from seed?

Hi Hoy,
Sorry I think the Peony was from a commercial source.  I have some Peony seeds doing a warm treatment now.  The only Paeonia I have germinated myself are from seeds I collected  (seeds die relatively quickly?).  Even then it's a long warm treatment followed by 3 + months at cold then growth at warm.  Paeonia cambessedesii, from warmer Southern areas including Crete, might take less stratification?

Yes I think peony seeds die in a year or less. At least they germinate easily the first winter when sown fresh but are difficult to germinate later. When I sow peony seeds I either place the pots outdoors or in a cold greenhouse.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Gene wrote:

Hoy, we are having a very dry warm spring in the Pacific NW.  The previous three springs were very wet and cold.  So I am getting caught up on a lot of gardening chores this spring.

The Ribes sanguineum flowers before the leaves emerge.

We are still in the spell of winter :-\ We have had one of the coldest and driest springs for 160 years. A lot of sun though but very cold nights like a montane inland climate.
Got one inch of sleet tonight - the first precipitation for several weeks. A lot of evergreens are badly damaged and even Crocuses struggle to survive with very small flowers.

My R sanguineum always has started leafing out when flowering.

Fermi, I am jealous! I don't think any of those gems are fit for y garden!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Gene, some good stuff there, although it is Ribes sanguineum that really catches my eye, its now on my "shrubs list" :D

Charles, pretty Crocus shots, attractive with the pine needle thatch.

Fermi, what festive floral fireworks to finish the fall season, fabulous! :o

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tingley
Title: Member
Joined: 2013-01-07

Mark, I second your opinion on Ribes sanguineum, both the standard pink/red cultivar, and the alba form such as 'White Icicle'. Joy Creek nursery in Oregon carries several cultivars:

http://www.joycreek.com/Ribes-sanguineum-White-Icicle-526-017.htm
http://www.joycreek.com/Ribes-sanguineum-King-Edward-VII-526-010.htm
http://www.joycreek.com/Ribes-sanguineum-Brocklebankii-526-015.htm
http://www.joycreek.com/Ribes-sanguineum-Variegata-526-011.htm

Brocklebankii strikes me as a bit too bright, though I haven't seen the plant in person. Somehow have to find a source for King Edward VII and White Icicle,  here in Atlantic Canada (or find a way to become a source!).

Southwest Nova Scotia, zone 6b or thereabouts

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Although the redflowered flowering currant is quite common here, the other forms are totally absent. Can't understand why. I would love to get 'White Icicle' in my garden!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Lapageria rosea (Chilean bell flower) is in full bloom here --not as many as last season when i gave up counting after reaching 300 flowers  :o ..... but not bad all the same  :)

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

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