What do you see on your garden walks? 2012

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cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

I Tried to post this earlier today, with no luck- either the snow interferes with internet (cell phone towers) reception, or more people using smartphones and internet due to weather- bad connections .. hopefully will work now..
Nice views Rick! Great to see the texture and colours of the different seasons.
It seems so long ago that we had those autumnal scenes- and in fact its 3 weeks ago today that we switched to winter white - definitely the earliest that has happened since I moved back in 07. We had a little melting this week, but that too is a distant memory now with at least 20cm of fresh snow yesterday and today, and still coming down..(a few more inches on these beds now)
A couple more views from the day before winter,

Ribes I think this is a European plant grown in gardens- denser than native species, but to me inferior in all other ways (flowers and fruit are both tiny even by Ribes standards, leaves usually not that exciting in shape or colour) but this fall it had the best colour I remember..

 

Dasiphora (Potentilla) fruticosa I don't know if this is a cultivar or more or less natural material, planted here years ago by my mom or aunt; part sun location in average to moist native soil, it is around 3-4 feet high sprawling through a fence..

And the way things look now- a couple of views from last night of the rock beds in front of the house; These are taken hand-held with ambient light from the outdoor house lights; not exciting shots, but still impresses me what cameras can do now!

 

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Peden
Title: Member
Joined: 2012-01-04

Autumn is a beautiful and very important time in the rock garden. Here's just a taste of the splendor!
First; rock is important to rock gardeners. Without the rocky backdrop, this is just another photo of Allium thunbergii. 2: It hasn't bloomed yet but Acantholimon litwinovii is a charmer. 3: Sedum (aizoon?) looks like this all winter. I don't know any other plant that produces this effect as well as this one does.

   

4: A smattering of Androsaces. 5: pink tint in Bailey's Lace Cactus 6: Sage Brush growing points become a soft silvery green and very compact.

   

7: Eriogonum umbellatum 'porteri'. 8: Vaccinium 'Hamilton' in front of Scirpus caespitosus. 9: One everyone in the Northeast should grow and cherish; Hepatica (americana) shown here in an unusual rock garden setting.

   

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

Peden
Title: Member
Joined: 2012-01-04

More autumn colored goodies: Hudsonia ericoides in Spruce Moss; Eriogonum caespitosum; and Pyxi.

   

Kabschia Saxifrages are at their very best now; Seed stems on Orostachys iwarenge; Areneria tetraquetra in front of Eriogonum sp. from Fishlake cow meadow in Utah. The Eriogonum is a fine ground cover but very shy to bloom.

   

I started in spring with a photo of this little patch of mesic alpine turf. Primula 'Peter Klein' was in bloom then. Just autumn hues now, diagonal from bottom left Cassiope sellaginoides 'globularis'; Lonicera crassifolia and Loiseleuria procumbens; Arcterica nana in autumn hue and flower buds ready for spring; Rhododendron williamsianum. The last are Saxifraga 'Foster's Red' and a tiny little Heuchera I found in the Lemhi Mountains maybe H. rubescens. Too many pretty vignettes to ever post!

 

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Cohan : I thought with  those last photos that you had made contact with the Mars Curiosity project!Weirdly atmospheric in the snow.

Michael: lots still of interest there.

Maggi 

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Gene Mirro
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-25

McDonough wrote:

I put plastic bags over the heads and zip-tied them. Just ran outside (with 50+ mph gusts) and so far they're holding up okay. For a couple other items I wanted seed on, I covered the plants with large heavy inverted pots, weighted down with boulders and bricks.

I use plastic milk crates to protect small plants.  Not the ones that you buy; they will break down in the sun.  The ones that the dairies use are nearly indestructible.  I got dozens of them for free from the local dairy.  The bunnies won't go near them.

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Maggi- you're right, there is little of earthly reference in those night snow photos..lol

Michael- still very many interesting things there! Even if I've prematurely entered the part of the year where simply seeing a patch of bare earth is exciting.....lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Steve Newall
Steve Newall's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-08-23

Some of my Anisotome latifolia are flowering in the garden . Their native habitat is on the subantarctic islands far to the south of New Zealand where they are an integral part of the megaherb ecosystem . Unlike their cousins on the NZ mainland (where white is the predominant flower colour ) the plants of the subantarctic islands have coloured flowers as well as interesting foliage . I can only grow a few species as some struggle in our warmer summer , colder winter and drier overrall conditions

Balclutha , New Zealand

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I do like it! Although it looks a bit coarse it is stately and handsome with interesting leaves and flower colour. Is it monocarpic or perennial? What do you mean by cold winters? I wonder if it could survive in my garden where the summers are cool, the climate moist and humid and not too cold winters (usually not colder than -8-10C).

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Not a lot of temperature variation on those islands by continental standards.  Macquarie Island's record high and low are 14.4C (58F) and -9.4C (15F) since 1948 when recording began.
http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/averages/tables/cw_300004_All.shtml

How old are those Anistome?  Are they still increasing in size, year to year?  How do they look late in the summer... a bit bedraggled?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Gorgeous species, Jandals!  They're very tall plants, aren't they?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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