What do you see on your garden walks? 2012

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Right, Cohan.  Trees that are impressively big here in Minnesota are just run-of-the-mill further south.  I can imagine that the difference is even more so where you are.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Toole wrote:

I admit to having a few plants  in pots  --far too many :-[ :-[    --mostly duplicates of easy bulbs that grow well in the garden--however a number are more specific and need to be under cover in winter as an aid to control moisture levels---i find pots easier for photographing  -For all of the above though, the main reason is that my garden is 'chocka block',(full),and i haven't yet resolved the battle between purchasing plants/sowing seed verses lack of space--although that day is not far ahead .... ;D

Cheers Dave.

Well ---yesterday i solved some of the space issue .... for the meantime  ;D

I was forever trimming back some large shrubs on the west side of our driveway ---namely a large Rhodo 'christmas cheer', a good sized pink Camellia and a vicious rambling rose which had grown up into the surrounding trees and was leaning over the entrance way catching the top of the truck each time i drove in.
I was in some ways sorry to see them go .

15 minutes with the chainsaw then a couple of rather full loads to the tip where it all will be chipped into mulch .

Then I sort of lucked things a bit --while pulling out the roots of a honeysuckle about half a metre inside the cleared area i came across a railway sleeper --then i found another further on and realised that this was the edging line of the original bed --in the end i located and dug up 13 sleepers--they show a bit of deterioration having been buried on their side into the ground for at least 20 years ,but will do .

There is a little weeding ,then the fun part begins --I'll probably be able to plant out about 70 seedling Trilliums ,divide /move a few Hostas from elsewhere , as well as a few different Epimediums and a number of native ferns at the far shaded end ,hoping to keep everything well below a metre in height .

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Peden
Title: Member
Joined: 2012-01-04

Here's a couple shots taken through my back 'doting window' today. I am presently in the process of taking down the
perennial plunk; first photo and to right in second (The Fothergilla will remain unclipped; but I've considered removing
it; see view below). Some folks leave spent perennials up, and that is fine as they are decorative, but taking them down
gives me opportunity to well trample rodent infested ground and check for rogue weeds that may have taken a bet on hiding
there. All the clippings will be left on the bed. The adjacent lawn is being religiously raked. Lawn is lawn; plunk is
plunk, and shade is shade (shade at left in photo 2). Fallen foliage is encouraged on the shade bed; discouraged on the
lawn; and tolerated on the plunk. It is not tolerated on the rock gardens! This leaves me with plenty of mosey "work" at
this time of year; ensuring that the alpine beds go into winter free of fallen leaves -just as the plants there would have
it if they had not been removed from their breezy homes. However, I suppose, the main reason for taking the perennials
down in this garden is twofold; One, the view of the rockeries from the subject window is cool. It daily reminds me of
some of the high points in my life in a small yet glorious sort of way when it is set upon a level and clear foreground,
and, two; several thousand snowdrops will appear here in April. They will appear through the desiccated remains of the
leveled perennials as if upon a mountain tundra after the winter's thaw.

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Good job, Dave!  It's always exciting to have new gardening space, isn't it?

Great views, Michael.  I see some beautiful stonework in there!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Yip for sure Lori .

Divisions of 5 different Hosta's are already in, the same number of Epimediums as well --will start on the 'others' tomorrow after work if i have the energy . :-\

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

You make it sound so easy Dave! Gives me added impetus to get on clearing some of the overgrown parts of the garden. I have similar plantings of woodlanders under rows of apple trees, several of which need some concerted work.

Michael - I am incredibly envious of that naturalistic background to your garden. We live in suburbia so no such 'genius of the place'.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Lots of work, Dave! Good to have some new planting space- I know I'd have a hard time removing mature shrubs if they were still looking good, but sounds like a good choice.. The only yardwork possible here now is snow removal and tree cutting...lol

Michael- nice views! I forget, is the wooded area at the back, part of your property? Good to hear what you do for winter preparations and the whys of it; My plantings are mostly very new (apart from old perennials here before I moved back) so I'm still figuring out what needs to be cut back etc. So far I have not cut back anything, though I had meant to do a few before the sudden lasting snow put an end to garden activities..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

An update from here: http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=1009.msg20214#msg20214
(Actually, this was a full week ago.)
The end of the Cotinus, Cornus mas, Vv. x'Juddii', carlesii.  Viburnum x 'Juddii' foliage.
       

Now in real time, a painted styrofoam trough makes a nice background for Orostachys iwarenge.  I've never thought of Fibigia clypeata as being polka-dotted.
       

Some things just keep going and going, like the Energizer Bunny. ;D
Syneilesis aconitifolia seedhead with Corydalis ochroleuca and Fargesia rufa in the background.  Digitalis lanata and Bouteloua gracilis.
       

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Really nice to see those seedheads Rick. I've always thought that these could form the basis of a good book on seeds and seed-sowing, but I've never got the camera out and worked on this. The detail of some plants seedheads (like Dictamnus) are fascinating.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Kristl Walek is working on such a book.  I'm not sure what all will be her main emphasis, though.  But I could certainly collaborate if you're in need of examples of various seed receptacles.  A feng Shui specialist would be horrified walking into my house.  "Dead" materials are everywhere...    ;D

   

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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