What do you see on your garden walks? 2012

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externmed
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-03-01

Amazing how much difference a week can make.
Crocus photo today, Corydalis BlacKberry Wine, Allium thunbergii, and Aconitum 1 week ago.
Charles Swanson NE MA USA

NE Massachusetts (New England) USA  zone 6 (5B to 6B)

gardens visited, photographs:  www.flickr.com/photos/wildmeadow

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Rick, which witchhazel is that (fun semantically asking that ;) )

Charles, nice stretch of Allium thunbergii there. Regarding the Aconitum, I had posted an unknown Aconitum species on Facebook that the local garden club members share around here, and it looks just like your plant. After an hour of research, I think it looks like Aconitum carmichaelii 'Arendsii', I'm sure that's it.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

externmed
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-03-01

Hey Mark,
Think this one (Aconitum) came from Herronswood.  Not clear from the picture, but it's 5 to 7 ft.  I'm planning to try everyone I can find, as they are quite seriously deer-proof.  Most not that easy though, either suffering from fungus or summer dryness (or both).
Charles

NE Massachusetts (New England) USA  zone 6 (5B to 6B)

gardens visited, photographs:  www.flickr.com/photos/wildmeadow

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Cool flowers, Rick! I thought I had some healthy seedlings of wild Hammamelis, but not sure if I lost track of the pot or what, I don't think I saw them this year  ???  Definitely can't imagine any plants that start flowering at this time of year- even if we weren't in an early stretch of winter..

Charles- interesting about the Aconitum- I had a small plant from a friend in Poland planted fall 2011, it came up in spring and was promptly eaten by something, but came back and grew for a couple of months, till it was eaten again- no sign of it after that :(

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

externmed
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-03-01

Rick,
That Hamamelis virginiana is a lot nicer than what we have wild around here.  Is it a cultivated variety?
Charles MA USA

NE Massachusetts (New England) USA  zone 6 (5B to 6B)

gardens visited, photographs:  www.flickr.com/photos/wildmeadow

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Well something ate 3 of the 4 umbels on one of my Allium thunbergii f. album, a rabbit I would suppose.  I guess they are not oniony enough. :D

There is something irresistible about members of the Hamamelidaceae family.  Rabbits seem to search them out.  I had very special seedlings growing from native seed here, and the first night I put them out they were eaten.  Same with a fothergilla plant, too.  Maybe this also goes for Lauraceae, too, as sassafras were promptly eaten also.

That's a Hamamelis virginiana, Mark.  I got it as a plant mail order from Girard's back in 1982.  The photo is labeled now.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Charles, this Aconitum (carmichaelii 'Arendsii') seems easy and tolerant of varying conditions, it see it in various yards around here.  Mine is 6' tall, a few shoots a bit shorter.  I'm with you, so far as looking for more species, very interesting plants.

Rick, too bad about the rabbit munchings, that is so irritating. We have two rabbits in the yard this year, and they loved Vernonia lettermannii nearly to death, ate it to a stub early in the summer, it grew out and was budded up, then they ate it to a stub again, will have to protect with wire mesh next year.  Young tree seedlings seem to be very tasty, had a devilish time a few years back getting maple species seedlings to survive nibbling onslaughts.

So, my Hamamelis x intermedia 'Jelena' is NOT, its actually H. virginiana, glad to have a correct ID on it.

This might be a lame attempt at protecting developing seed pods on my Allium thunbergii 'Alba' from two days of soaking downpours from Hurricane Sandy, happening as I type this message, but I put plastic bags over the heads and zip-tied them. Just ran outside (with 50+ mph gusts) and so far they're holding up okay. For a couple other items I wanted seed on, I covered the plants with large heavy inverted pots, weighted down with boulders and bricks.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I found the first flowers of my Hamamelis virginiana about a week ago, although it is quite a few years since I planted it. The flowers are not very impressive yet and smaller than Rick's but I hope they'll improve the years to come!

Aconitum 'Arendsii' is the commonest garden aconitum in Norway I think! But all Aconitums and Delphiniums are prone to slug damage, at least in my garden :-\ I have tried several species from seed and they are prompt devoured. I always suspect slugs (and snails) but rodents are possible too but not rabbits (cross fingers).

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Yes, yours would be H. virginiana, Mark.  I don't think there is any other species that blooms in the fall.  And of course, it's the wrong color for Jelena.  My shrub gets a fair amount of direct sun that really doesn't increase flower size, but does increase flower numbers. 

I hope those bags hold, Mark.  I see you have one pinned down with a stick.  A wise move, I think.  My region from the beginning has been predicted to be one of the areas least hit by climate change, and so far, I think that's been true.  I'm not envious at all for your storm of storms out east, and I heard a prediction of 3 feet of snow in Virginia, too. 

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

I think Virginia already got the 3 feet of snow..
Rick, this area also seems to be (so far) avoiding some of the extra extremes (this climate is extreme enough without climate change!) many other areas have had- our winters have been near normal when others have had excessivley warm/dry or unusually cold winters, no serious summer heat waves or droughts either (in the last few years at least, but then ups and downs of moisture are not out of the normal)..

Trees going down on lines always seems to be a big problem when those big storms come- here, at least in the countryside, they try to keep all trees pruned well away from lines, so we don't see much of that, but  in more heavily populated areas, with trees larger than most are here, I guess it's not possible..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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