What do you see on your garden walks? 2012

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Aureo-striatum Lily of the Valley is not a very stable cultivar.  Every year I cut out reversions.  Consequently, it increases slowly.

Fibigia clypeata I keep around for dried arrangements.  The seedpod "windows" are quite ornamental.  Fibigia eriocarpa I am trying just to see how it is different.  This is its first year blooming - not too impressive, I might add.

       

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

I think I should be tempted to try Fibigia again; in seed it is quite a plant! It never looked as good as that in my garden.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Fran, I also grow Ranunculus gramineus and love the way the sharp yellow flowers seem to float above the surrounding plants.  It introduces a new level in the garden and self sows, but not aggressively.  I used to have Viola aetolica which always self-sowed, but it seems to have disappeared or been taken over, too bad.

Barstow
Barstow's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-08-27

Rick: I couldn't see any difference in the Fibigias when I grew them - have now lost them - they self-sowed a few years here..

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Thanks for the that, Stephen.  The F. eriocarpa does grow in drier and heavier clay soil than the others.  The photos are not a perfect comarison, and this is only the second year from seed for F. eriocarpa, while I have grown F. clypeata for many years.

Tim (or anyone), PM me if you would like clypeata seed.  I can send it off right now, if you like, rather than waiting for fresh batch of seed.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Some great plants!  You are ALL ahead of me...including Lori.  We have had 1-3 C for a week now and everything is in suspended animation.  After a record warm April, looks like a record cold May!

Rick, love the foliage on that Peltoboykinia...I have a few seedlings up so keeping my fingers crossed.

Only new alpine opening at the moment is Arabis flaviflora...not yellow as you would think but with a lovely yellow centre.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

RickR wrote:

An unexpected treat, Buciniczia cabulica actually overwintered during this extremely mild and practically snowless winter.  I never knew (but why would I?) that it was such an early bloomer: it already has a flower stalk!

Is that unusual there, Rick?  Judging from the specimens in the garden of an alpine expert here, it is very hardy... (and I have some seedlings of it waiting to be planted out!)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Howey wrote:

Anne - being partial to yellow and "waterfalls", those genistas you posted are to die for.  Right now in my rock garden there are Potentilla hyparctica, Ranunculus grammineus, Kerria japonica, Ribes odorata and Laburnum blazing away - such a cheering sight when we have been having a spell of dull weather just now.  Will post some pics when I get on to this new camera.  I promise.  Fran

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b

Looking forward to it, Frances!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Oh my, Lori!  I had no idea about the Buciniczia!  Somehow, I had the idea that it was only hardy to zone 6.  It is pretty unknown here.  I have only seen it once before in someone annual container garden, and also sold as such at a nursery.

Incidentally, after she saw my post on the Forum, Shirley mentioned that she had kept another in her cold frame for "back up", but the stem rotted at the soil line.
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An update with Fargesia rufa:
The drought that continued from late August until two weeks ago took its toll.  Despite the ridiculously warm winter, practically every leaf dried up.

       

So this is the first year that I have decided to treat it as an herbaceous plant, and I cut everything to the ground.  As these bamboos do every year, new culms are generated profusely.  

             

Many of the stalks themselves were still alive and green.  As I removed them, I notice that they would make nice fillers for dried floral arrangements.  

       

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Lots of good colour there, Todd! Never fear- you always have my garden to make you feel much advanced ;) I have retic Irises just barely in flower, and Scilla and Cory solida budding- maybe something will open the next few days which should be sunny after a week (two?) of mostly cool and wet weather- unusually rainy for springtime here, but not a bad thing.... We missed the snow that fell in southern Alberta today, just some scattered rain showers here..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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