What do you see on your garden walks? 2012

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Peden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-04

Cohan; I was unable to get Ranunculus ficaria going in my giant sand bed of a yard despite its aggressive reputation. The Mertensia has been around for a while and does reseed. Both probably like wet soil at least in spring. The Ranunculus probably likes it heavy.

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Anne- fantastic!

Bundraba- no sand in sight here!  lol I do have one end of the yard that stays fairly moist, though often we have a dry spell in spring after the snow is gone and before summer rains start.. This year is different- April was a bit wetter than usual, and May is off to a wet start with a couple of days of rain- spotty yesterday, but pretty steady so far today...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I don't think R ficaria grows in a (dry) sand bed :o
They prefere moist soil at least in the spring, then summer drought is no problem. It is two different forms though, one spreads by seeds (no bulblets) and the other by bulblets (no seeds). My plants are mostly the bulblet-type, except the pale one.

Your garden shots are something to enjoy too, Charles! So is your Genista, Anne!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Although all the rhododendron flowers were damaged in early April frost the buds were not.

Here are two. Rh lanatum 'Muncaster Castle' and an hybrid of unknown parentage. The flower truss looks small but that's due to the very big leaves!

   

For the first time in three years the ivy managed to ripen the berries. They flower late fall and are pollinated mostly by flies etc. The birds do eat the fruits and spread the seeds.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

cohan wrote:

Trond- I like your weeds! I wonder if R ficaria is hardy and/or weedy here? the mix of yellow and white is nice...

Cohan, I've found R. ficaria to be somewhat hardy here, lasting for 3-4 years, though perhaps the dry conditions I had it in were not ideal for it and contributed to its short life.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

The Rhodos are great, Trond- not so many of those hardy here! There are some newish hyrbrids supposed to be hardy, though I doubt they are as big as yours, and probably mostly deciduous.. I haven't tried any yet...

Thanks for the ficaria comments, all.. worth trying, I guess!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Howey
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-05-17

Anne - being partial to yellow and "waterfalls", those genistas you posted are to die for.  Right now in my rock garden there are Potentilla hyparctica, Ranunculus grammineus, Kerria japonica, Ribes odorata and Laburnum blazing away - such a cheering sight when we have been having a spell of dull weather just now.  Will post some pics when I get on to this new camera.  I promise.  Fran

Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

cohan wrote:

This Thlaspi actually looks something like the only one we have here (the weed)  ;D --I know this one is smaller and cuter with bigger flowers, though the one I saw blooming a week or more back was actually very tiny..lol

Many years ago, I almost grew Thlaspi arvensis (our native weed) on purpose, before I realized what it was. :D  I have to say, though, that the seed pods do look nice in a dried floral arrangement.

Anne, those genistas are truly spectacular.  Thanks for showing them off.  It would be a travesty to keep them all to yourself!
----------------------------------------
More from the garden:

     Stylophorum diphyllum and Mertensia alpina alba
       

     Convallaria majalis 'Aureo-striatum'
             

     Fibigia eriocarpa and Fibigia clypeata
       [

     An older Fibigia clypeata
             

     Thermopsis fabacea and Pulmonaria 'Silver Streams'
       

     Peltoboykinia watanabei
             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Fran- we're eagerly awaiting you getting your camera going :)

Rick- nice stuff, I'm trying to recall whether I know Fibygia or not, seems interesting... the variegation is really nice on that Convallaria!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I am usually not fan of variegated plants but the Convallaria seems to be worth an exception!

I also like those Peltoboykinia leaves!!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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